In welcomed news for the residents of Michigan, Toyota announced today an investment of $100 million over the next four years on an advanced research activity in their backyard. The funding will be centered around the newly established Toyota Research Institute of North America (TRI-NA), which is tasked with accelerating advanced research on energy and the environment, safety, and mobility infrastructure. TRI-NA will not build new facilities, however, though it will utilize existing space in Ann Arbor, Michigan, at the Toyota Technical Center.

The Governor of the state, Jennifer M. Granholm, understandably welcomed the news. In addition to the millions of dollars pumped into Michigan's economy, TRI-NA hopes to be staffing upwards of 60 employees by 2010. For those who are counting, Toyota now directly employs over 43,000 in North America, and it purchases more than $30 billion in parts, materials goods and services from North American suppliers each year. While a still a drop in the bucket compared to what our own domestics spend in this country, it's not for nothing.

[Source: Toyota]



PRESS RELEASE

Toyota Establishes Research Institute in North America


April 1, 2008 - Ann Arbor, Michigan - Toyota Technical Center (TTC) a division of Toyota Motor Engineering & Manufacturing North America, Inc., today announced the establishment of the Toyota Research Institute of North America (TRI-NA). Toyota plans to spend $100 million during the next four years on advanced research activity in North America and will utilize existing facility space at the Toyota Technical Center Ann Arbor campus.

Toyota has been pursuing Sustainable Mobility, which addresses four key priorities: advanced technologies, urban environment, energy, and partnerships with government and academia. Based on these priorities, TRI-NA will accelerate advanced research on energy and environment, safety, and mobility infrastructure.

The Toyota Research Institute will be directed by Dr. Noboru Kikuchi, who is the Roger L. McCarthy Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Michigan and also a Director of Toyota Central Research & Development Laboratories, Inc. in Japan. Dr. Kikuchi will report directly to Mr. Yasuhiko Ichihashi, President of Toyota Technical Center-NA. TRI-NA initially will employ 35 researchers and administration staff, and plans to add 10 researchers in 2008 and an additional 20 by 2010. "Creating the Toyota Research Institute is the next step to strengthen Toyota's advanced research function throughout North America and to discover cutting-edge technologies for sustainable mobility," said Dr. Kikuchi.

"Toyota's decision to establish the Toyota Research Institute in Ann Arbor to direct advanced research activities for North America is another piece of good news for Michigan," Governor Jennifer M. Granholm said. "Toyota's decision demonstrates that Michigan is a leading state for research and offers an attractive business climate for companies to grow."

Toyota (NYSE:TM) established operations in North America in 1957 and currently operates 13 manufacturing plants. In addition, new plants are under construction in Ontario, Canada and Mississippi. There are more than 1,700 Toyota, Lexus and Scion dealerships in North America which sold more than 2.9 million vehicles in 2007. Toyota directly employs over 43,000 in North America and its investment here is currently valued at more than $21 billion, including sales and manufacturing operations, research and development, financial services and design. Toyota's annual purchasing of parts, materials, goods and services from North American suppliers totals more than $30 billion per year.

Toyota currently produces 11 vehicles in North America, including the Avalon, Camry, Camry Hybrid, Corolla, Matrix, Sienna, Solara, Sequoia, Tacoma, Tundra and the Lexus RX 350. When production begins in Ontario and Mississippi, Toyota will have 15 manufacturing plants with the annual capacity to build approximately 2.2 million cars and trucks, 1.49 million engines and 425,000 automatic transmissions. For more information about Toyota, visit www.toyota.com.


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