it may not be the most original take on the question of why we don't have a robust EV infrastructure in America today, but Michael Kanellos's post over on CNET on just who killed the electric car is nonetheless a very good read.

Take this line as an example: "This is General Motors and Ford Motor we're talking about. U.S. automakers are the last bastion of industrial feudalism on the planet. The most innovative things they've come up with in three decades are the cupholder and the Lee Iacocca goggle glasses. (It was a huge fashion statement back in the '70s, kids.) These people are going to engineer a global conspiracy that eludes regulators around the world, financiers and competitors? GM execs are more concerned about who gets named to the Rolling Hills Country Club membership committee."

You like? There more where that came from, but if you're pressed for time the takeaway point is that making a "real" EV for the masses is no easy task, and the difficulty means there are a lot of reasons why no automaker has tried since the EV1 and RAV4 EV and Ranger EV went away. The success of hybrids, trouble with building a better battery, the inherent difficulty in making and selling cars and - very importantly - cheap customers are all to blame.

I heartily disagree with Kanello, though, when he says that understanding something by "follow(ing) the money", is something only crazy people do. There's a lot that gets revealed when we look at financial motives.

[Source: CNET]

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