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Skilled trade workers at Volkswagen's factory in Chattanooga, TN, will vote in early December whether to join the United Auto Workers.


Volkswagen has approval to expand its growing Chattanooga, TN, factory by even more than the initial plan. The automaker is adding an additional 130,153 square feet to the current 538,000 square feet of construction.


Volkswagen has recognized a second union at its Chattanooga factory. This one is called the American Council of Employees and positions itself as an anti-UAW group. Both organizations have access to company management but neither have a collective bargaining agreement.


After months of fighting from both sides, it looks like the Volkswagen factory in Chattanooga, TN, might unionize under the United Auto Workers after all. According to a letter acquired by The Associated Press, VW and the UAW reportedly struck a deal last spring where the union agreed to stop its challenge of the organization vote with the National Labor Relations Board to help clear the way for the CrossBlue to be produced in Tennessee. In exchange, the automaker would recognize the UAW at the


The struggle over unionization at the Volkswagen factory in Chattanooga, TN, continues to get more complicated. There's now a second union fighting to organize at the plant; although this one is staunchly against the actions of the United Auto Workers. At the same time, the UAW is still signing up voluntary members to its recently created Local 42 at the facility and is reportedly near having a majority of the hourly employees on its side.


Well that didn't last long. It appears that the struggle by the United Auto Workers to unionize the Volkswagen factory in Chattanooga, TN, is far from over, despite dropping its appeal of the failed vote to the National Labor Relations Board. This time it may even have renewed support coming from VW's Global Group Works Council.


We've reached a new step in the ongoing drama at Volkswagen's factory in Chattanooga, TN. The United Auto Workers recently dropped its opposition to the union vote and agreed that it wouldn't hold another ballot for at least a year. Now, the new question becomes where VW is going to build its forthcoming midsize SUV.


The ongoing scrutiny over employees at Volkswagen's Chattanooga plant voting on whether to join the United Auto Workers isn't over yet, despite the fact that the organization drive was turned back by workers weeks ago. In the latest development, WTVF-TV in Nashville has received leaked documents alleging that the government of Tennessee offered the German automaker financial incentives partially linked to denying unionization at the plant. The government reportedly later retracted the proposed m


I can imagine fairly well that another VW factory in the United States, provided that one more should still be set up there, does not necessarily have to be assigned to the south again. ... If co-determination isn't guaranteed in the first place, we as workers will hardly be able to vote in favor [of another VW plant in the southern US].


Corker has been "assured" a new CUV will come to the plant if it votes against the UAW


United Auto Workers has been pushing to unionize Volkswagen's Chattanooga, TN plant, and Volkswagen seems to be open to the idea - the two parties already have discussed an employee "works council" for the factory, which would require UAW organization - but the automaker says it will only recognize UAW if employees approve the move via a formal secret ballot. But now some workers are claiming that VW is coercing them into joining the union, The Tennessean reports.


The "will they, won't they" back-and-forth in the United Auto Worker's courtship of Volkswagen's Chattanooga plant is still in full swing, as the union, German and American executives and most importantly, employees, try to figure out just what the future of labor relations will be at a plant that sits in a right-to-work state.


The United Auto Workers is in hot water with some of the very workers it is trying to unionize at Volkswagen's Chattanooga assembly plant. According to The Tennessean, eight Volkswagen factory workers have filed complaints against the UAW with the National Labor Relations Board, claiming the union "misled or coerced" them into formally asking for union representation.


A new Volkswagen crossover may be joining the Passat at the German automaker's Chattanooga, Tennessee factory, a facility recently in the news lately due to grumblings over an increasing potential for UAW unionization. Marc Trahan, Executive Vice President of Quality for VW in the US, told assembled media at a press luncheon yesterday that, "Right now I'd have to say Chattanooga's in the lead." Such strong wording from an executive bodes well for the Tennessee plant, which was opened by VW in 20


Volkswagen and the United Auto Workers union are now one step closer to achieving a deal that would see VW's plant in Chattanooga, TN become unionized. If it happens, it would be the first major victory in recent years for the UAW at a plant in the United States run by a foreign automaker. The UAW had formerly represented workers at VW's Westmoreland plant in Pennsylvania, which first opened in 1978 and is now closed. At present, the only non-Domestic facility in the States that is unionized is


Get a job, get in shape. Or something like that. Whatever you want to call it, Volkswagen is taking the rather unusual step of putting all of the newly hired production line workers at its new plant in Chattanooga, Tennessee into a mandatory fitness program before they can begin working.


Although the ceremonial opening of Volkswagen's new plant in Chattanooga has been delayed, locals are anticipating the arrival of what is shaping up to be the largest employer in town. Case in point: local television station WRCB has managed to get hold of a concept rendering of what Volkswagen will be building in their backyard. Called the New Mid-size Sedan (NMS) in the interim, the as-yet unnamed sedan should be rolling off the Tennessee assembly line within a couple of years. If it ends up l


When building a new factory, especially one as large and complex as an auto manufacturing plant, there are plenty of elements that can throw things off schedule. Scheduling itself, however, is rarely the problem, especially for a German company. But that's the reason why Volkswagen has delayed the groundbreaking ceremony for its new plant in Chattanooga, Tennessee. According to VW spokespersons, the ceremony is being delayed until March due to several members of the company's management board in

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