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7India says GM flouted emissions test regulations

General Motors India appears to be up to some shenanigans. In July, the company had its first vehicle recall since 1995 when 114,000 Chevrolet Tavera sport utility vehicles needed to be brought in over "emission standards and other regulatory specifications," according to Reuters. A government official who declined to be named told Reuters that the global automaker has been flouting testing regulations since that time.

39BIg Oil's favorite anti-clean energy study knocked down by review panel

Oil companies and other supporters of the fossil fuel status quo have been using a study by Boston Consulting Group (BCG) to attack California's landmark clean energy bill AB32, particularly the bill's Low Carbon Fuel Standard (LCFS). Oil companies have been particularly irate that the LCFS requires them to reduce carbon pollution from gasoline and diesel 10 percent by 2020. But when the BCG report was roundly criticized, the Big Oil tried to come to the rescue. Now, an independent panel of scie

3Study: Vehicle emissions down 14% since 2007

Consumers are now buying cleaner, more fuel-efficient vehicles, according to something called the Eco-Drive Index that was compiled by researchers at the University of Michigan. In fact, the researchers found that emissions from recently purchased vehicles are 14 percent lower than back in 2007.

AddSin City's illegal activities include falsifying vehicle emissions tests

How's this for a peek into the Las Vegas underworld? The U.S. Department of Justice indicted ten men in Vegas Friday for falsifying vehicle emissions tests. Some men allegedly falsified about 250 vehicles, but one did over 700. Because the air in some parts of Nevada, including Las Vegas, has levels of carbon monoxide and ozone that are higher than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's standards, the state is required to test vehicles and make sure they're not adding too much to the problem

AddFrost & Sullivan predicts the future of green cars on a global scale

We all know the auto industry is changing to a greener shade of exhaust, but how much and how fast is the big unknown. Frost & Sullivan, a 46-year-old global analysis and consulting company, has attempted to calculate these rates of change, and today released some of that information. The takeaway number for me is that F&S thinks that 69 percent of all vehicles globally will continue to run on gasoline in 2015. Another 26 percent will use diesel. So that's 95 percent right there still su

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