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The final tally on the cost of the US auto industry bailout is in. With the recent sale of shares of Ally Financial, the Feds invested $79.69 billion to keep GM, Chrysler and their financing divisions afloat and recouped $70.43 billion – a net loss of $9.26 billion. However, in the government's official numbers it lost $16.56 billion because the smaller number factored in interest and dividend payments. The total was still far less red ink spilled than some estimates predicted.

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The US Treasury will come out ahead on its bailout of Ally Financial, unloading its final shares for an estimated $1.25 billion and bringing its total profits on the Ally rescue to $18.3 billion on a $17.2 billion investment. That's a net win.

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Apparently, the cost of the US Treasury's bailout of General Motors is still being calculated. A new report from the Special Inspector General for the Troubled Asset Relief Program, which oversees the TARP initiative, found that the US government has lost more money on its investment than previously believed.

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According to a report from CNBC, the US government has sold off the last of its remaining shares in General Motors. Secretary Jack Lew reports that $39 billion of the $49.5 billion investment in GM has been recovered, meaning that the investment, on paper, cost taxpayers a total of $10 billion.

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When we last checked the status of the federal government's stake in General Motors in September, it owned about 7.3 percent - roughly 101-million shares worth about $3.7 billion - of the automaker. In October, the Fed sold almost a third of its remaining stake, or 29- to 30-million shares valued at about $1.2 billion, The Detroit News reports. Currently the government owns around 71-million shares.

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The US Treasury has announced a $9.7 billion loss on the $49.5 billion it used to bailout General Motors in 2009, according to a report from the The Detroit News, which in turn cites the quarterly report from the Special Inspector General of the Troubled Asset Relief Program to Congress.

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The US Treasury's sale of General Motors stock continues, with the unloading of more than 110 million shares between May 9 and September 13 netting the government agency $3.82 billion and reducing its stake in GM to 7.3 percent, Reuters reports. The Treasury also confirmed that it now holds 101-million shares, which are on track to be sold by March 2014.

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The United States Treasury has shuffled another 135 to 137 million shares of General Motors stock as it continues its exit from the Detroit-based manufacturer. According to The Detroit News, the July sale netted the government $876.9 million, which was valued between $34 and $37 per share.

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Special Inspector General Christy Romero has delivered another report to Congress on the state of the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) up to June 6 of this year, assessing numbers to the US Treasury's remaining stake in General Motors. After stock sales in February and another a few months later, the Fed is still the owner of 14 percent of GM, totaling 189 million shares, and is $18.1 billion in the hole after the $49.5 billion loan to the automaker. Although the share price has risen more t

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The next step in the US Treasury's efforts to eliminate its financial interests in General Motors will involve the sale of 30 million shares of the automaker's stock. The government's move to divest itself of GM is all part of a larger plan to sell the remaining 300 million shares of stock it received in compensation for the 2009 bailout of the then-failing automaker. The US Treasury plans to sell off all remaining stock – around 18-percent of GM – by early next year, yet this 30 mil

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In December, the US Treasury granted General Motors the rights for the company to once again buy corporate jets and for its executives to fly on them, but neither those execs nor the ones at Ally Financial will get any raises this year. The automaker, worried that top talent might leave for higher-paying pastures, reportedly sought a more "market-based approach to executive compensation" for 12 of its top 25 execs. Because the federal government still has stakes in both GM and Ally, though, the

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True to its word, the US Treasury Department has taken steps today to rid itself of its remaining 300-million shares of General Motors stock. The Treasury has engaged both JP Morgan and Citigroup Global Markets to handle the sale of the remaining shares, reports the Detroit Free Press.

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Former General Motors chairman and CEO Ed Whitacre is in the papers today, specifically the Opinion section of The Wall Street Journal, espousing a strong belief that the U.S. Treasury should get out of GM's hair as quickly as possible. Whitacre's sentiments come, no doubt, as a response to the recent news that GM has been pressuring the Treasury to sell off its remaining 500 million shares of the company's stock.

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The saga of the U.S. Treasury's involvement with General Motors has become the theater of call and response: the call is Treasury announcing how much it stands to lose on its bailout of GM, the response is a turgid chorus of "Government Motors!" and "They should have died!" peppered with a few defenders trying to make themselves heard. Well, here we go again, since the latest Treasury report filed states that it stands to lose $25.1 billion on the 500 million shares of GM stock it still owns.

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With a multi-volume list of issues that a presidential hopeful could discuss, we aren't sure why Mitt Romney keeps circling back to the auto industry bailouts, but here we are again. He's lately swinging his stick at the U.S. Treasury Department for not having sold its 26.5-percent stake in General Motors, accusing it of holding back on the stock sale to avoid having to report a multi-billion dollar loss before the election.

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General Motors stock has been languishing for months, failing to climb past $30 per share since July of last year. Trading at around $22 per share today, the optimism that surrounded the company's emergence from bankruptcy and initial public offering in November 2010 has all but vanished. So it's no wonder that the United States Treasury has decided to sit on its GM shares, with no plans to sell of its remaining 26 percent stake in the automaker.

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The Detroit Free Press reports that the United States Treasury has exercised its power to put a cap on executive compensation at General Motors by freezing CEO Dan Akerson's pay at last year's levels. Akerson brought home a total of $9 million last year including salary, stock and restricted stock.

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The "Government Motors" crowd isn't going to be happy about this: The Detroit News is reporting that the U.S. Treasury now says it has lost an extra $170 million in the auto industry bailout. The culprit? The declining price of General Motors stock.

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