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106Dissecting the biggest factors in why millenials aren't driving

Millennials are driving less than previous generational groups. It's a reality which America is dealing with at the moment, which automakers are trying their best of overcome and which sociologists are apparently studying with increasing intensity. The question is, why?

81The Best and Worst Automotive Trends of 2010

What a year. After the out-and-out implosion of the car market in 2009, no one quite knew what to expect from 2010. It would have been impossible to predict the rise of both General Motors and Chrysler from the bowels of Chapter 11 to the relatively comfortable perches they now occupy, or the depths to which the Toyota recall spiral would plummet. But 2010 wasn't just about big stories, either. The past year saw a horde of trends both good and bad rise to the surface, and we've picked a handful

28Repo-related violence on the rise, expected to get worse

Repo men working in rural Alabama attempt to take a man's car at 2:30 am. The car's owner, 67-year-old Jimmy Tanks, hears noises and steps outside with his gun. Shots are fired and Jimmy ends up dead. The tables were turned on another repo man working in Alabama, who ended up dying of a gunshot wound. A third repo man, also in Alabama, was wounded by a gunshot while towing a vehicle away.

AddEdmunds.com's green automotive trends and forecasts

Edmunds.com, an automotive information site, has compiled its list of 2006 automotive trends. Among the green trends were:

AddMommy? What's petroleum?

Richard Webb speculates what a world without any products made from petroleum would be like. He points out, though, his thoughts are not mere musings or an environmentalist's hope, but a projection of continued high gas prices and their impact on society. He describes the path to said future, from U.S. and China's voracious appetite for oil, BP's issue in Alaska, and, finally, the "third shock" that will hit when the cost of oil reaches $100 a barrel by 2008. Webb agrees with analysts who see co

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