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Early Projections Show 8.1-Percent Increase in Fatalities In First Half Of 2015

In some respects, there's never been a safer time to ride in a car. The number of vehicle occupants killed in traffic accidents dipped to 21,022 in 2014, according to the federal agency that tracks the numbers. It's the lowest total since record-keeping began in 1975.


Teens Need Guidance Beyond Parents While Learning To Drive

The number of teen drivers involved in fatal crashes has been halved over the past decade, but traffic collisions still remain the top cause of death for teenagers.


Driving Related Deaths Are On The Rise In 2015

Safer cars don't necessarily make for safer roads as car related fatalities are on the rise in 2015.


Roadway Deaths On Pace For Largest Percentage Increase In 69 Years

The economy is good. The gas prices are low. This is an ideal summer for road-trippers, commuters and motorists of every kind. But the good times come at a high cost.


In Philadelphia, city officials are running a public-safety campaign that implores road users to simply "Put. Phone. Down." In Florida, a similar advertisement reminds people, "Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow." Interestingly, the campaigns are directed at pedestrians, not drivers.


Focusing On Human-Caused Fender-Benders Misses The Point

Here we go again. Google reported Thursday another one of its self-driving cars was involved in a traffic accident earlier this month. The crash occurred near the company's Mountain View, Calif., headquarters July 1.


But Teens Still Have High Crash Rates, Pose Danger To Others

Teen drivers are far less likely to be involved in fatal car accidents today than at any other point over the past two decades.


Fatalities among motorcyclists are projected to fall to 4,584 once all of the 2014 numbers are tallied, marking the second consecutive year deaths have decreased.


FiveThirtyEight takes a look at how speed limits are set, and wonders whether a better system of setting speed limits and shepherding traffic safety could lead to fewer road deaths.


IIHS Finds Death Rates Dramatically Vary Depending On Make And Model

New car designs are playing a prominent role in reducing traffic deaths, but the odds of getting killed in a car accident still dramatically vary depending on the make and model of your car.


For the first time since 2009, motorcycle fatalities decreased year-on-year in 2013: the Fatality Analysis Reporting System compiled by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration counted 4,668 motorcyclist deaths last year compared to 4,896 in 2012.


AAA Says Fatigue-Related Crashes Significantly Underreported

AAA estimates drowsy driving is responsible for 6,400 deaths a year.


Motorists in Massachusetts and Washington DC can breathe easier on their afternoon commutes today. Their chances of dying in a traffic accident are the lowest in the nation. Drivers in West Virginia, South Carolina and North Dakota, on the other hand, may want to be especially vigilant. They're collectively navigating some of the deadliest roads in the United States.


Many used cars don't contain criticial safety features that could keep kids safer

Teen drivers are the most vulnerable motorists on the road. They take unnecessary risks. They're inexperienced. They're more likely to sit behind the wheel of used cars that don't contain the latest safety technology.


Car accidents carry a heavy price tag for Americans, regardless of whether or not they've been involved in a crash themselves.


Driving in Europe is the safest it's been in over 10 years, according to a report from the independent European Transport Safety Council. Fatalities on European Union and Swiss roads fell to around 12,000 in 2012, less than half of the 28,000 deaths in 2001.


Big Apple is 1 of 3 U.S. cities to receive federal grant money Friday

For the past two weeks, New Yorkers have marveled at the sights of the latest concept cars and production vehicles at the annual New York Auto Show. As the show winds into its final weekend, they're turning their attention back toward the darker side of driving.


One of the deadliest states made the biggest improvement

For the first time in four years, the number of pedestrians killed on American roads has fallen.


Study says seniors have reduced fatal accidents faster than middle-aged counterparts

Senior citizens are safer on the road these days. They're less likely to be involved in car accidents than they have been in the past. And if they do crash, they're less likely to be hurt or killed.


As road deaths rise, there's fewer attempts to protect Americans

More Americans are dying in traffic accidents. Fewer laws are being passed to protect them. Those are the conclusions of a traffic safety group that monitors state-by-state efforts to regulate the rules of the road.


A world without traffic fatalities sounds like a pretty nice future. New York's newly inaugurated mayor, Bill de Blasio, is aiming to make the Big Apple just such a place, following through on his ambitious "Vision Zero" plan to eliminate all fatalities to drivers, passengers, cyclists and pedestrians on the city's streets within 10 years.

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