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Recently elected New York City mayor Bill de Blasio inaugurated his "Vision Zero" plan last year to reduce traffic deaths in The Big Apple to zero by 2024. The numbers for 2014 show the initiative is headed in the right direction: pedestrian deaths dropped to an all-time low of 132, down from 179 in 2013.

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AAA Says Fatigue-Related Crashes Significantly Underreported

AAA estimates drowsy driving is responsible for 6,400 deaths a year.

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In U.S., 14 out of 100,000 people killed in car accidents

A new study released this month found traffic fatalities higher in the U.S. compared to other industrialized countries.

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A world without traffic fatalities sounds like a pretty nice future. New York's newly inaugurated mayor, Bill de Blasio, is aiming to make the Big Apple just such a place, following through on his ambitious "Vision Zero" plan to eliminate all fatalities to drivers, passengers, cyclists and pedestrians on the city's streets within 10 years.

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Seat belts and alcohol test would be required to start car

The government is speeding up research on safety systems that automatically prevent drivers from operating their cars if they are drunk or aren't properly buckled in.

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AAA has list of safety tips for concerned parents

Halloween is scary for reasons beyond ghosts, goblins and witches. It's one of the deadliest days on the calendar for pedestrians.

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The Detroit Free Press reports the new generation of Brazil-built cars are to blame for the country's high death rate. Thanks to a booming middle class, Brazil is the fourth-largest vehicle market in the world, but four of the country's best-selling models have failed independent crash tests. Couple those machines with the country's notoriously dangerous roads and weather, and Brazil winds up with a traffic death rate nearly four times that of the US when weighted for the disparity in the size o

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Our sister site, AOL Autos, reports more people are dying in car accidents in the US than ever before. Fatalities jumped by 5.3 percent last year to 34,080 deaths, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. The increase is due in part to the fact that Americans are also driving more than ever before, covering 0.3-percent more miles in 2012 than 2011. NHTSA says that may be due to the fact that modern vehicles offer better fuel efficiency than before, and thus allow drivers

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Less than two weeks ago, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reported that 2011 traffic fatalities had declined by nearly 2 percent – to the lowest level in more than six decades. Now comes word that the first nine months of 2012 haven't been nearly as positive. According to the government agency's preliminary estimates, traffic deaths through September of this year have risen 7.1 percent when compared to last year's figures – the largest increase for that calendar per

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After a new analysis of 2011's traffic fatality numbers, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reports that there were even fewer deaths than previously reported: 32,367 are reported to have died on the road last year, a 1.9-percent drop compared to 2010. Previously the drop had been reported as 1.7 percent. Even more eye-popping, that number is down 26 percent compared to the number of deaths in 2005, and 2011 saw the the lowest number of fatalities since 1949.

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Automotive News reports U.S. traffic fatalities have increased by nine percent during the first six months of this year compared to the same period in 2011. A total of 16,290 people have died in road accidents between January and June, and while the figures have yet to be verified, they may represent the most deaths during the first six months of a year since 2009.

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Just as safety authorities were lauding the decrease in automobile driver fatalities and lamenting the unchanged motorcycle rider fatalities for 2011, we get news that traffic deaths have risen overall in Q1 of this year by a whopping 13.5 percent. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration puts traffic fatalities at 7,360 people, a rise from 6,720 in the same period last year and representing a jump from 0.98 deaths to 1.10 deaths per 100 million miles traveled. The National Safety Coun

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Traffic fatalities are the No. 1 killer of young people

Every six seconds, someone is killed or seriously injured in a traffic accident. Every day, 3,500 people are killed in car crashes.

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United States Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood said that traffic deaths in 2010 were the lowest they've ever been, falling three percent from 2009's record low. According to National Highway Traffic Safety Administration projections, traffic fatalities fell from 33,808 in 2009 to 32,708 in 2010.

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According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the number of fatalities on America's highways is at its lowest level since 1950. The number of deaths in vehicle collisions last year fell by 9.2 percent compared to 2008. As of 2009, the fatality rate has dropped to 1.13 deaths per 100 million vehicle miles traveled. NHTSA says the decrease is largely thanks to increased seat belt use and effective campaigns against drunk driving.

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According to an annual report published by the National Safety Council, there were 39,800 deaths last year related to motor vehicles in 2008. That's an 8% improvement over the previous year, and it's not entirely due to fewer miles driven, as the ratio of deaths per vehicle miles driven has also dropped.

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Safer vehicles and increased law enforcement has resulted in the lowest driving fatality rate ever last year. There were 41,059 traffic deaths in 2007, down 1,600 from 2006. Fatalities are now at 1.37 per 100 million miles traveled, which is the lowest number since the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration started keeping track. The proliferation of safety technology, like side curtain air bags, stability control, and traction control, are apparently helping to make our roads safer, and

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Photo: splorp - Licensed under CC 2.0

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Hispanics and Native Americans face dramatically higher odds of dying in an automobile accident than do whites, blacks, or Asians, according to a study on the topic recently released by the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration. The trend is said to be caused by an increased rate of intoxicated driving, more drivers without a valid operator's license and decreased seatbelt usage among the higher-risk ethnic groups. A NHTSA spokesman stated that the agency is "not sure there

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While new vehicles continue to sprout ever-increasing numbers of safety features, traffic fatalities still hit a 15-year high in 2005, notching 43,200 fatalities according to a recent release by the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA). This represents an increase of 1.2 percent over 2004, while miles traveled only increased by 0.03% to a jaw-dropping 2.964 trillion. The projected death rate is still only 1.46 per 100 million miles traveled, which is only a sli

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