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But Enthusiasm Varies Widely Depending On Where You Live

A new survey shows Americans support police using red-light cameras in traffic enforcement. They're not as enthusiastic about speed-camera use.


As US Cities Drop Camera Programs, Revenues Fall For US Company

After less than two years on the job, the chief executive officer of a leading traffic-enforcement equipment manufacturer is resigning amidst a time of financial turmoil.


Colorado Democrat Says Automated Enforcement More About Revenue Generation Than Safety

A US Congressman has introduced legislation that, if passed, would prohibit the use of automated cameras in traffic enforcement across the country.


Protesters rallied against speed cameras sunday in one Long Island county

Automated traffic enforcement cameras are falling out of favor across America. A Long Island anti-camera group was the latest to protest Sunday.


Protesters Rallied Against Speed Cameras Sunday In One Long Island County

On election night, Jason Sonenshein merely hoped an anti-traffic camera ballot initiative for which he had campaigned would squeak out a win.


Four Anti-Enforcement Ballot Measures Pass By Wide Margins

There's ongoing debate over the need for traffic cameras that aim to catch red-light runners and speeding motorists. Law enforcement officials say they promote safer driving. Critics say they're nothing more than a money grab.


Two Traffic-Camera Trends On Divergent Paths

Over the past three years, the number of speed camera programs has grown from 115 to 140.


A toucan followed its nose up to a traffic camera mounted high above a highway in Sāo Paulo, Brazil, setting off an cute scene involving the tropical bird making an appearance on the camera's feed. Alas, it seems unlikely that he discovered any delicious breakfast cereals during his investigation.


The debate over automatic cameras for speed and red light enforcement is already fairly intense, but a secret audit from 2012 of the traffic cameras in Baltimore, MD should heat things up a bit. In an audit of the city's 83 speed cameras, The Baltimore Sun is reporting that 13 had a double digit error rate, which helps account for a system-wide error rate of 10 percent. Of course, the secret part of this secret audit was that the findings were never released to the public.


The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) released a study this week that seems to go against what critics and the media have been reporting for years. According to the report, some people – more specifically, a large majority of the residents in Washington D.C. – actually like red light and speed cameras.


We can't say for certain, but we imagine that "don't run down pedestrians" is somewhere near the top of every police officer's daily to-do list. One patrolman in Orlando seems to have missed that memo.


A lot of companies are making (or at least trying to make) money these days selling devices that improve drivers' odds of beating traffic cameras. As it turns out, though, having a Florida license plate on the back of your car could be the best defense against paying traffic fines like red light camera tickets and toll violations. According to new reports, some Florida plates are proving hard for traffic law enforcement cameras to read. With as many specialty license plates as the Florida Depart


Inventor Jonathan Dandrow's idea began when he first noticed that some cameras can pickup the infrared light from a television remote. It's a piece of useless information at first.


Say this about the residents of Prince George's County, Maryland: they really don't like speed cameras. According to the Washington Post, disgruntled citizens have shot at a camera with a gun, set one on fire and even, allegedly, fired glass marbles in a speed camera's direction.


What you see above is a video of a Santa Fe man who's had it up to here and is not going to take it anymore. The New Mexico city has a deal with Redflex to operate unmanned speed enforcement vehicles which are parked along the road to photograph breakneck miscreants.


There has been plenty of debate about whether bicyclists should be able to take up a lane typically reserved for motor vehicles. While that argument is far from settled, we can all agree that hit-and-run accidents between cars and bikes have got to stop.


City councils and state legislatures across the country are debating and passing initiatives to put traffic cameras on school buses. Rick Gresham, transportation director for the Cobb County school district in Georgia, told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution that 1,100 motorists pass his school buses when the stop sign paddle is out every single day. The state of Maryland reported 7,200 such incidents in one day last year. For all the folks who want to see that bus-riding children get to class and


Abiding by traffic signals is perhaps the simplest rule of the road. Any preschooler can tell you what red light means, but that doesn't stop a staggering number of drivers from ignoring the lights altogether. ATS, a company responsible for manufacturing red light cameras, wants us to think a little harder about coming to a complete stop the next time we lose the right of way. The company says that more than 100,000 people are injured in collisions involving a driver who ignored a red light.


Police in Calgary have partnered up with a company to install the Noise Snare, a sound-activated traffic camera designed to automatically ticket loud vehicles. According to The Calgary Herald, the device would typically cost municipalities around $112,500 Canadian, though the company behind the technology has been kind enough to supply one unit free of charge as part of a pilot program that could see the system spread across North America.

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