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Trademark filings from the UK suggest that the Amazon show from the former Top Gear hosts might be called Gear Knobs.


BMW and Google could be on the way toward a dispute over the name Alphabet, the new company under which the technology giant now lives and which BMW already owns the trademark for.


Ford has trademarked the name Ranger Raptor in Australia, and the company has been spied testing an off-road-ready version of the pickup with a snorkel, fender flares, and a brush bar.


Toyota has filed for a trademark in the US for the Prius Prime, but the documents give no hints as to what the vehicle might be.


Does a new patent filing indicate that the next Toyota Supra will be called S-FR?


General Motors now has trademarks for both Krypton and Camaro Krypton. They suggest that the company is considering a new color for the pony car or just maybe a special edition for the upcoming Superman movie.

Yamaha Has Given Consent To GM To Use Bolt Name For Upcoming EV

An ongoing trademark dispute over the Bolt name could be cleared up because Yamaha says Chevy can use it.


You Might Think The Car Is Really A Motorcycle

The US Trademark Office suspends GM's application for the Bolt trademark because Yamaha already has one for its motorcycle.


Porsche has filed a trademark application in Europe for the name GT5, suggesting it could be planning an even more accessible track model to slot below the Cayman GT4.


Buick now holds the trademark on Sport Touring for the Regal and LaCrosse sedans. The filing might suggest a future trim level or special edition for the models.


GM's latest trademark application suggests it's working on a truck with the name "Badlands," but just what form it will take - if it ever does at all - is a matter of pure speculation at this point.


The idea of an Acura-badged Honda HR-V is picking up steam, as the Japanese company's premium brand registered a trademark for "CDX," with the US Patent and Trademark Office.


A trademark application filed by General Motors for the name Z71 Trail Boss suggests a more hardcore off-roader could be in store for Chevy or GMC in the near future.


Audi wants to use the names Q2 and Q4 for coming crossover products, but Fiat owns those trademarks and appears unlikely to sell them. It's said that Fiat CEO Sergio Marchionne is loathe to do anything that would aid any company under VW Group CEO Ferdinand Piëch.


Chevrolet has reapplied for the trademark "Crossvolt." It originally applied for the name in 2011, then let the application expire this year. The theory is that the name could be applied to a Chevrolet Volt crossover.


Fiat files trademark registration with the USPTO for the model names "124" and "124 Spider." The filing could presage a Fiat coupe and convertible built on the 2016 Mazda MX-5 Miata platform that was previously going to be used for a new Alfa Romeo.


Ever since Opel brought out the Cascada convertible last year, rumors have been flying that Buick would offer it Stateside – much like it does with the Insignia-based Regal and the Astra-based Verano. And now we might have our best clue yet as to what Buick might call it.


Development of Bentley's forthcoming utility vehicle is almost complete, and the British automaker has painted a vivid picture of what to expect: otherworldly luxurious, a range of powertrains including a twelve-pot and a hybrid, and a price tag that is sure to eclipse any other SUV or crossover on the market. One of the biggest questions still remaining, however, is what Bentley will call the thing, but we might have our answer right here.


Green may have been a popular color choice for the classic Jaguar E-Type, but even in Lightweight form (pictured above), it was hardly what you'd call environmentally friendly. Not by today's standards, anyway, with six-, eight- and twelve-cylinder engines displacing between 3.8 and 5.3 liters. But Jaguar looks to be preparing to revive the nameplate – or at least one similar – with a new electric vehicle in the works.


When we read reports that Ferrari had applied for a patent on a V-twin engine design, our first thought was to check the date: this says the first of October, right... not April? And so here we are, entertaining the notion that Ferrari could be developing a motorcycle engine.


There may not be many ways to forecast what an automaker is planning for the future, but there are some. Trademark applications are one of them, and Chrysler has just applied with the US Patent and Trademark Office to protect the name "Trackhawk." The question is, what's it planning on using it for? We don't know for sure, but we can put together an educated guess or two. And one guess is that Jeep will use the name to replace the letters SRT on the performance version of the Grand Cherokee.

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