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Tokyo, New York Already Under Consideration For Season 4

Discussions are already underway for new Formula E races in seasons to come in locations like Hong Kong, Australia, Tokyo, and New York.


Toyota, Honda, Nissan All Kicking In Funds For The Tokyo Games

Much of Tokyo's hydrogen refueling infrastructure for the 2020 Olympics will be subsidized, in part by domestic automakers.


Hydrogen-Powered Lexus LS, Toyota Crown, And Estima Minivan All Possible

Toyota isn't going to let its Olympic sponsorship go to waste. In time for the 2020 games in Tokyo, the company wants to have at least eight new vehicles ready, including three possibly powered by fuel cells.


Toyota and Hino will begin a week-long test of a hydrogen fuel-cell bus on public routes in central Tokyo from July 24-30.


Automaker Will Have One Mirai To Show, One To Go (Test-Drive)

Toyota will open a special showroom in Tokyo for the hydrogen-powered Mirai fuel-cell vehicle.


Toyota, Park24 Will Charge About $3.50 Per 15-Minute Intervals

Toyota will make i-Road three-wheeled EVs available in April for Tokyo car-sharing program at a cost of about $3.50 per 15 minutes.


The government in Tokyo, Japan, is embarking on an aggressive plan to put 6,000 hydrogen fuel cell vehicles and have 35 hydrogen refueling station in the city in time for the Olympic games there in 2020. It's working with Toyota and Honda to hopefully make the goal a reality.


Honda lineup for Japan's version of the SEMA show, the Tokyo Auto Salon, is lead by the new N-Box Slash but includes oddities of every shape and size.


There's something bizarrely fascinating about Japanese car culture, especially around Tokyo. The metropolis packs people tightly together in a way that would seem to make owning any car tough. And yet, there's still enough enthusiasm around anything with an engine to support everything from wildly tuned bosozoku rides with exhaust pipes reaching toward the sky to seriously fast Porsche and Lamborghini models.


It's been two years since Toyota first revealed its Camatte show car at the Tokyo Toy Show. Though sadly never destined for production, Toyota brought the concept back the following year as the Camatte 57s roadster, and is now returning to the same show with yet another take on the kid-friendly, configurable 1+2 with interchangeable body panels - this time with a slew of features that are fresh not only to the concept itself, but to the industry altogether.


OK, here's where we think those road tests will start to get a little scary. Those super-narrow all-electric three-wheeled Toyota i-Road vehicles may have looked great sashaying through the towns of the French Riviera. But now? They're being tested in Tokyo. Hoo boy.


Japanese automakers and their tuning divisions have descended upon the Makuhari Messe in Chiba City for the 2014 Tokyo Auto Salon. And for Honda, it's all about Mugen.


The Tokyo Auto Salon kicked off this weekend, filling the slot in the Japanese car scene that SEMA does in North America or Essen does in Germany with tuned and modified versions of domestic automobiles. Of course, Toyota wouldn't miss out on the opportunity to show just how far its JDM models can be taken, and to that end brought no fewer than 34 customized vehicles to the Makuhari Messe in Chiba City.


Last month, Subaru unveiled the Levorg concept at the Tokyo Motor Show, previewing what could be the next Legacy wagon. But that's not the end of the story for the concept car.


Fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) powered by hydrogen were taken more seriously at the LA Auto Show and Tokyo Motor Show last month than ever before, but their presence in the market is still shrouded in fog. Soichiro Okudaira, chief officer of research and development at Toyota, is confident fuel cell costs will come down enough to make FCEVs "just one alternative of the eco cars," but that probably won't happen for another 10-15 years.


Tokyo Motor Show, Los Angeles Auto Show, Car and Driver 10Best list

Episode #359 of the Autoblog podcast is here, and this week, Dan Roth, Michael Harley and Jonathon Ramsey talk about the LA Auto Show, Tokyo Motor Show, and the release of the Car and Driver 10Best list. We start with what's in the garage and finish up with some of your questions, and for those of you who hung with us live on our UStream channel, thanks for taking the time. You can follow along after the jump with our Q&A. Thanks for listening!


LA and Tokyo show recaps, Car & Driver 2014 10Best

We're set to record Autoblog Podcast #359 tonight, and we'll be joined by Michael Harley and Jonathon Ramsey to recap the Los Angeles Auto Show and Tokyo Motor Show. Check out the topics below, drop us your questions and comments via our Q&A module, and don't forget to subscribe to the Autoblog Podcast in iTunes if you haven't already done so. To take it all in live, tune in to our UStream (audio only) channel at 10:00 PM Eastern tonight.


To reiterate what Editor-in-Chief Neff said in our LA Auto Show wrap-up from earlier today, let's never do this whole two-major-shows-in-one-week thing ever again. Oh sure, we handled it, doing our whole obsessively kicking butt thing on a global scale. But here we are, Friday evening, and we're spent.


Though most Formula One teams are based in the UK, they hail from places all around the world. There are teams from Russia, India and Malaysia, but in the 1960s, the idea of an F1 team coming from as far away as Japan was unthinkable in what was a predominantly European racing series. That's just the notion that Honda aimed to upset when it entered the car you see here in the 1964 Formula One World Championship.


In America, Nissan attempts to slake our kinschlepping needs with its slow-selling Quest minivan, but in Japan, where consumers seem a lot less reluctant to buy MPVs, there are a lot more models for every size family and budget. Nissan itself offers no fewer than six such minivans, including the popular Serena seen here.


Japan may be best known, at least among motorcycle enthusiasts, for its sport bikes. But as we found at the Tokyo Motor Show this year, Japanese motorcycle manufacturers are capable of producing all kinds of motorbikes. And to our delight, that includes cafe racers.

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