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2740+ cars that barely avoid the gas guzzler tax

Why It Pays To Be A Good Test Taker

The Gas Guzzler schedule, with mpg ratings and charges that haven't changed since 1991, lays out which fuel-swillers owe what to Uncle Sam.

67Ford taken to task by gov't for Chicken Tax end-around [UPDATE]

Ford is in a bit of a pickle for importing and selling Turkey-built Transit Connect cargo vans as passenger vehicles in the US, then converting them to commercial-vehicle specification stateside in an effort to bypass a 25-percent tax imposed on vehicles imported for commercial use. Automakers are required to pay a 2.5-percent tax on imported passenger vehicles.

61Report: Swiss Ferrari driver hit with record $290,000 speeding fine

Switzerland doesn't mess around when it comes to speeding tickets. Get caught with a lead foot in the land of Alpine vistas and serious chocolate and the cost of your transgression won't be based on a flat rate for the infraction, it will be based on how wealthy you are. An unnamed driver of a Ferrari Testarossa found this out the hard way when he was caught driving 85 miles per hour through the village of St. Gallen. According to the BBC News, the driver was a repeat offender and his crime was

15PSA: IRS lowers mileage deduction for 2010 - will you owe more in taxes?

When gas prices rose in 2008, one of the few bits of good news was that the federal government was bumping up the business mileage deduction to 55 cents per mile. Now that gas prices have stabilized in 2009, the Internal Revenue Service has reportedly decided to cut back on some of its generosity. According to Wallet Pop, the new per mile rate is 50 cents, a nine percent decline from a year ago. The decrease will likely do little to the casual business traveler, but high mileage sales types and

44Germany joins EU in taxing CO2 emissions

European car ads are always mentioning how many grams of CO2 a car emits because more than twelve European countries tax drivers based on those emissions. Germany, home to a cadre of automakers for which CO2 parsimony is not a prime consideration, has held out from the carbon dioxide taxation scheme, until now. The leading government coalition has finally agreed on a plan to tax CO2 output.

72Ward's columnist wonders if Americans can handle the truth about gas taxes

var digg_url = 'http://digg.com/autos/Can_You_Handle_the_Truth_About_High_Gas_Taxes'; People have always had something of an aversion to hard truths. Most Americans say they want their country to get off foreign oil or help the environment, but when it comes to the bottom line, they want cheap fuel. And when the prices on gas pumps start to dip, consumer interest in smaller more efficient vehicles tends to go out the window. Understandably, drivers everywhere tend to make vehicle purchasing d

AddACEA loves CO2 taxing schemes, with conditions

The ACEA (European Automobile Manufacturer's Association) recently published a statement that calls EU members' tendency to tax vehicles according to CO2 production figures a positive step. The ACEA recognizes that it's an effective and wise measure to make motorists choices more fuel-efficient vehicles. They do not, however, think that a Registration Tax (such as Spain) is adequate or that most of the work is done, since current schemes still rely on power, cylinder capacity or a combination o

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