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AddTraffic pollution exposure linked to autism in young children

Living close to highways has built-in health hazards. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, asthma and carbon monoxide poisoning are two major public health problems caused by air pollution. Now, autism could be added to the list.

AddDriving a hydrogen car on a hot day? Drink the exhaust for refreshment

Here's an interesting way to look at hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, courtesy of the California Fuel Cell Partnership. In a new blog update, the CaFCP says, "Nothing like a little exhaust from a fuel cell electric vehicle ... water so clean you can drink it."

AddStudy: Vehicle emissions down 14% since 2007

Consumers are now buying cleaner, more fuel-efficient vehicles, according to something called the Eco-Drive Index that was compiled by researchers at the University of Michigan. In fact, the researchers found that emissions from recently purchased vehicles are 14 percent lower than back in 2007.

17CARB offering compromise on emissions regulations?

After protests by California auto dealers, the head of California's Air Resources Board (CARB) said she is willing to discuss modifying one aspect of the state's stringent emission regulations. Mary Nichols, CARB Chairwoman, told reporters at an SAE Government/Industry meeting that she is open to "regional" standards for tailpipe emissions, rather than the current standards that create state-by-state standards.

AddThe EU to copy heavy-truck and passenger bus emissions rules from US

The European Commission has started the consultation process for new legislation to reduce particullate and NOx emissions from heavy-trucks and buses tailpipes. This new set of rules will be ready for the end of the current year. The norm, labelled Euro VI, will be inspired in the future by US EPA rules in order to create worldwide homogenous rules for automakers.

27U.S. Supreme Court to consider government's role in CO2 regulation

The Supreme Court announced Monday that it has agreed to hear an appeal filed by a number of states, cities and environmental groups hoping to force the federal government to regulate carbon dioxide emissions from vehicles. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maintains that it cannot regulate CO2 emissions because the Clean Air Act does not give it the authority to do so. An appeals court ruling last year upheld the EPA position.

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