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3Swedish Automobile changes name back to Spyker

What's in a name? Just ask the people at Spyker.

8Sweden picks up tab on bankrupt Saab's EU loan

Way back at the beginning of Saab's struggle for life after General Motors, exotic car firm Spyker was granted a €400-million loan ($527M U.S.) from the European Investment Bank. The loan was approved after it was guaranteed by Sweden's Debt Office, and Saab's recent bankruptcy filing forced the Debt Office to back up the guarantee with a €217-million payment ($286M) to the EIB – the portion of the loan that Saab actually drew upon.

11Spyker considers closure as Saab parent Swedish Auto loses board members

Swedish Automobile NV ('Swan') continues to look to sell Dutch supercar manufacturer Spyker in the wake of the Saab bankruptcy. Swan said it will carry on with the sale despite the fact that the company's supervisory board has just abandoned the crippled enterprise. According to The Washington Post, Swan announced it had begun negotiations to sell Spyker last September to a private equity firm for $41 million. Now the company says proceeds from that sale won't be enough to ensure that Swan can m

59Saab owners, employees, dealers and suppliers trying to figure out what comes next [w/video]

They're called uncharted waters, and everyone who has anything to do with Saab is floating in them. It's been a while since a global, decades-old automotive brand went bankrupt and wasn't rescued or provided immediate after-death care by a corporate parent, but that's the case with Saab, and no one's quite sure – not the company itself, nor dealers, nor employees, and certainly not customers – how this plays out.

13Despite expiring deadline, Saab talks with Chinese investors continue

Time is running out on the Memorandum Of Understanding between Saab parent Swedish Automobile and the automaker's two Chinese suitors. The MOU technically runs out today, though Automotive News reports that the three companies will continue talks even outside of a formal setting.

23Swedish Automobile may be forced to liquidate even if Saab sale goes through

Swedish Automobile just can't seem to catch a break. Its main brand, Saab, has received government protection from creditors, looked for loans and even secured a tentative deal with Chinese automakers, but even if it manages sell the Griffin marque, Swedish Automobile may still end up getting liquidated.

42GM moves to sever ties with Saab over Chinese owner concerns

Spitting out the equivalent of "No soup for you," General Motors has made stronger noises about shutting Saab off from its technology and component pipeline and the new 9-4X, due to the Swedish company's proposed takeover by Chinese firms Pang Da and Youngman. While the GM statement didn't appear to make a definitive statement of walking away, it did say "GM will not agree to the continuation of the existing technology licenses or the continued supply of 9-4X vehicles to Saab following the propo

51Saab agrees to be sold to Pang Da, Youngman

Despite shunning a previous takeover bid earlier this month, Swedish Automobile N.V. and Chinese automakers Youngman and Pang Da have signed a memorandum of understanding for the outright purchase of Saab and Saab Great Britain for just €100 million, or around $140 million USD. The deal is still subject to the approval of various authorities, including the Chinese government, but the deal is expected to go through. Guy Lofalk, an administrator in the reorganization of Saab, has officially w

7Pang Da, Youngman say original Saab deal still valid

As with any good breakup, the recent split between Saab and its Chinese suitors has birthed a bit of he-said, she-said. Automotive News Europe reports that Pang Da and Youngman have announced that their equity deal with the Swedish automaker is still valid even after Saab said that it was cancelling the arrangement. Saab accused both Chinese companies of failing to confirm or fulfill their commitments of interim funding while the automaker underwent government-protected restructuring.

26Admin trying to terminate Saab reorg, Muller responds by trying to terminate admin

Things are apparently getting nasty inside Saab as the company continues to scramble for a route to viability. Autocar reports that Guy Lofalk, the court-appointed administrator placed in charge of the company's reorganization affairs, recently applied to terminate the automaker's reorganization process. That move would effectively strip Saab of the protections it enjoys from its creditors while it seeks further investment from outside sources, which means it wouldn't be long before the company

28Saab board's retroactive pay raise comes at a bad time

Saab, which is currently on life support as money issues continue to pile up, is reportedly about to give its board members a bump in pay. Those aforementioned issues – the inability to pay suppliers and workers, the looming threat of bankruptcy – make the retroactive pay raises received by the Swedish Automobile N.V. (SWAN) board of directors seem just a tad poorly timed.

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