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Last November, the Boise State University student team called Greenspeed broke the land speed record for a truck (in its class) that uses vegetable oil with a run of 155 miles per hour. Now, they're confidently ready to go after the faster, dirtier, petroleum-powered trucks.

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It's that time of year again, kids. There are no auto shows on the horizon and most automakers have squirreled away all of their big announcements for later in the year in anticipation of the summer vacation season. What's an enterprising auto journo to do but rustle up some tasty vintage rumors for the web to feast upon? The crew at Motor Authority has taken to citing unnamed sources as saying that a 2.3-liter EcoBoost four-cylinder engine is slated to find its way into the engine bay of the 20

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Guide to Common Green Acronymns

Deciphering the new vocabulary of the green car movement can sometimes be a real head scratcher. To alleviate as much confusion as possible, we would like to present our readers with a list of common acronyms and what they mean, with plenty of links for more information. If you have some TLAs (that's three-letter acronyms) that you'd like us to add to our glossary, just let us know in the comments.

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We like to answer reader questions with our Greenlings series whenever possible, and thought that Timothy H. had a good topic. He sent in the following question/suggestion about straight vegetable oil (SVO):

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Converted plug-in Prius – Click above for high-res image gallery

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if you're used to filling up your car with standard gasoline, the difference between biodiesel and straight vegetable oil (SVO, but it also has other names) might be a clear as mud. Here's a cheat sheet. Important Point #1:

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It's no secret to the majority of our readers that it is possible to run many older diesel engines on nothing more than straight vegetable oil. In fact, the first diesel engine, invented by Rudolph Diesel, ran on peanut oil. This fact is also well known by the students at the Michigan Technical Academy who have converted their own school buses to run on waste vegetable oil. Garden Fresh Foods in Ferndale, Michigan is providing used veggie oil that was first used to fry tortilla chips for no char

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Click on the image for high-res shots of this diesel 1967 Mercury Cougar

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In many places around the world, roads are financed at least in part by a tax added to the price of fuel. When we head to the pumps, we pay for a little bit of the road we drive out onto as we leave the station. But people who make their own biofuels don't pay these taxes and yet they drive on roads other people pay for. To make sure the load is balanced out a bit, many governments tax biofuels whether they are home-brewed or purchased. To get an idea of how this plays out in Alaska, check out t

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The 20th World Solar Challenge took place in Australia in October. One of the more unusual fuel types in the Greenfleet Class of the Darwin to Adelaide race was used by a "Troupy," a lightly modified 1989 Toyota Landcruiser.

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Kicking off our forced-induction week with a tweeeeeee is Flickr member McTaylor's low-miles 1986 Mustang SVO. At least three of us Autobloggers are in love with this car. McTaylor prefers to keep his daily driver looking fairly understated, with only the really cool 2.3 fender badges giving a little bit away. Even then, it's only those in the know that will even pay attention to such details. As it is a daily driver, the mods aren't too wild. The boost has been pumped up to 18 psi by means of a

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Ed Beggs grew diesel fuel in Ontario on his Canadian farm for years without realizing it. He called it soybeans back then. Today the British Columbia resident knows better. He likes to call it premium diesel fuel. Why the paradigm shift? Because Ed and his U.S. business partner, Craig Reece, operate PlantDrive, one of the premier companies producing Straight Vegetable Oil/Waste Vegetable Oil (SVO/WVO) conversion kits and components for fueling diesel engines with straight plant oil.

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Ray Holan is an accomplished auto mechanic, biofuel advocate, author of the book Sliding Home: A Complete Guide to Driving Your Diesel on Straight Vegetable Oil and regular feature contributor to AutoblogGreen.

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There are a lot of considerations that go into greening your car. Some folks don’t mind the initial high cost of a hybrid or the work that goes into converting a diesel engine to run on SVO. Others see the rising cost of petroleum-based fuels and look to green technologies as a money saver. Then there are those who don’t know the difference between E10 and E85. If you’re the latter, then this Wisconsin State Journal mini-article will interest you.

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This is a newspaper story we're going to be seeing more and more in the coming years. The Wisconsin State Journal set out to show how increasing gasoline prices are raising interest in biodiesel and other alternative fuels. The solid article then goes on to showcase local biodiesel promoters and producers in Wisconsin. If you're looking for information about just how "green" Green Bay is, this article might be the right place to start.

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Ray Holan is an accomplished auto mechanic, biofuel advocate, author of the book Sliding Home: A Complete Guide to Driving Your Diesel on Straight Vegetable Oil and regular feature contributor to AutoblogGreen.

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If you’re new to the whole biofuel world, there may be a lot of terminology that you’re reading but not understanding. To that end, here’s a glossary of words we’ll be using regularly on AutoblogGreen, and what we mean when we use them. Stick around, and you’ll know your B20 from your FFV in no time.

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Boom shalaka-laka, the 28th Autoblog Podcast is here. On today's episode, the intrepid Christopher Paukert and myself go over Audi's ostentatious debut of its new TT coupe, observe a moment of silence for the industry's loss of MPH Magazine and finally, we get all green up in this thing talking about my experience with a 2003 Volkswagen Jetta TDi that runs on grease from a dumpster. Good times... hope you enjoy.

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One lesser-known movement in green car technology is converting diesels to run on SVO, or Straight Vegetable Oil. Unlike biodiesel, which is produced by chemically modifying vegetable oil so that it can be used in a diesel vehicle with no modifications, SVO requires a second fuel system for the vegetable oil in addition to the standard diesel fuel system. Also, one doesn’t operate and fill up an SVO vehicle like a normal petrol or diesel car. It sounds like a lot of work, so why are more a

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