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APTA says the biggest savings are available to NYC residents

Looking to line your pockets with some extra cash? Perhaps it's time to give up driving. A sobering report from the American Public Transportation Association (APTA) says that people using public transit in the 20 cities with the most riders save an average of $848 dollars a month, or $10,181 a year. Riders in New York see the greatest benefit, saving an average of $15,041 from January to December.

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Between the unfortunate saga of flight MH370 and the grand prix this weekend, Malaysia has been on our radar more than usual lately. And now the Southeast Asian country has popped up again, once more related to transportation issues, as Kuala Lumpur is working on a new subway system. Which isn't something we'd normally care about, but this subway just happens to have been designed by BMW.

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In 2013, Americans took a record 10.7 billion trips on public transit.

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Does no access to public transit mean no jobs? That's the argument that Adie Tomer makes in a report compiled for the Brookings Institution's Metropolitan Policy Program.

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BMW's product portfolio has expanded far beyond the sports sedans and cabriolets of old to include all manner of vehicles. But a subway train? You betcha.

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BMW: Bus, Metro, Walk. That was the tongue-in-cheek acronym we used to refer to public transport back in Montreal where this blogger grew up, but it's San Francisco that's about to have its underground mass transit system overhauled by BMW.

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Recently, the American Public Transportation Association (APTA) predicted that rising gasoline prices could lead to a savings of $14,376 for commuters in New York City who choose to switch from personal to public transportation. However, keeping that amount of coin in one's bank account may not be as simple as it first seems.

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With gasoline prices soaring, commuters who rely upon public transportation can now save even more cash than before, according to the American Public Transportation Association (APTA). On March 8th, U.S. gas prices hit an average of $3.50 a gallon, but individuals who travel by bus or commuter rail don't need to worry about filling up their tanks.

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Warsaw's metro system is going green in 2012. That's when the city will introduce new subway cars, dubbed the Siemens Inspiro, that will be 97.5 percent recyclable. Not only that, but the system will also be more energy efficient. The "weight optimized chassis" will be built out of aluminum, making these cars much lighter than the city's regular rail cars and reducing energy consumption.

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VW brings the fast lane to the subway – Click above to watch video after the jump

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In some place (New York City, we're thinking of you), taking public transportation is just the most sensible way to get around most of the time. In others (West Oklahoma, say) it can't even be considered. Still, if there is a bus or rail line near your home and work, taking advantage of it isn't just a deal for the environment, it's also way easy on your pocketbook.

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Bilbao, Spain, has a subway system that is famous for having its stations designed by Sir Norman Foster. There's now another reason that people might be interested in riding the underground rails. Metro de Bilbao, the company that manages the railway system, has announced that all the energy they used during 2008 was obtained from renewable sources and was supplied by Naturgas, a local utility. The company claims that the suburban train system has saved 46,000 metric tons of CO2 per year, about

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The Sundance Channel's Big Ideas For A Small Planet is back. The eco-solutions show tidily takes on an issue - like, say Fuel or Drive in episodes from last year's season - and finds three "Big Ideas" to discuss in a half-hour. Sometimes, the episodes are paired with a longer documentary, such as with the series opening Crude Awakening.

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The city of Monterrey, Mexico, will have its subway system, called Metrorrey, propelled with electricity obtained from biogas. Simeprode, the company that manages the city waste system, is finishing a 5.3 MW power plant that will produce electricity for the two subway lines. This plant will allow Monterrey not only to run its mass transit system with bioenergy but also to expand the subway networks in the near future. The remaining power will be used for public lightning. The technology was impo

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As U.S. cities take a new look at mass transit services (anticipating increased demand following rising gas prices), transportation planners might want to take a look at a recent survey sponsored by U.K. insurer esure. The survey of U.K. drivers finds that gas prices would have to reach the equivalent of a stratospheric $13.48 per U.S. gallon before they'd consider switching to mass transit.

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