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Give someone a hammer and every problem looks like a nail; hand volunteers radar guns and expect to find a whole lot of speeders – too many in fact. The police in a village in England can't keep up with the paperwork from all of the scofflaws. Now, the cops are asking these folks to stop trying to enforce the speed limit.

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In 2003, AAA took the unprecedented step of erecting billboards to warn motorists of speed traps ahead

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"I fought the law and the law won." So goes the song originated by the Bobby Fuller Four and popularized by the Clash. And with good reason, because typically when an average citizen challenges the authority of law enforcement, they end up at the wrong end of its long arm. That's what makes this situation so unusual.

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A tiny Florida town is in trouble with the state, after its police department wrote a whopping 12,698 speeding tickets despite holding jurisdiction over just 1,260 feet of road. Yes, feet, not yards, miles or kilometers.

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A federal judge in St. Louis has set the benchmark

A federal judge in St. Louis ruled Monday that a driver flashing their lights to warn other drivers of an impending speed trap is protected free speech.

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You're driving down a two-lane highway, moving at roughly the speed of traffic, perhaps a few miles per hour over the speed limit. Your passenger recommends to you that you slow down because of a well-known speed-trap area ahead. Good advice, right? But what about another passing motorist? Is it legal to flash your headlights at oncoming traffic to let them know of police presence in the area?

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Claims his actions are protected by the First Amendment

Texas police charged a man with violating city ordinance after he held a sign warning drivers of an upcoming speed trap.

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Missouri man and ACLU go to court

​When Michael Elli of Missouri flashed his headlights to warn other drivers of an upcoming speed trap in Ellisville Mo. he didn't think he was doing anything illegal.

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Anyone who's ever lived in the Midwest or driven through Ohio probably knows that the Buckeye State is legendary for the strict speed traps along its highways. After March 22, motorists driving along Interstate 71 near Cleveland will have a little more breathing room. That's because new state legislation will be shutting down eight of the mayor's courts in Ohio, including one in Linndale, the state's most notorious and controversial speed trap city. According to The Cleveland Leader, Linndale ha

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This story is irritating on so many levels. It involves a dreaded police speed trap, a good samaritan warning motorists of the potential fine and a 12-hour stint in a Texas jail cell.

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Count this one as a big victory for motorists. A Florida man has won his First Amendment case against the Seminole County Sheriff's Office, who wrongfully ticketed him for flashing his lights to warn other drivers of a speed trap. According to the Orlando Sentinel, a Circuit Court judge not only said that the deputy who ticketed Ryan Kintner had misapplied a state law banning aftermarket flashing emergency lights, but also ruled that flashing your lights to communicate with other drivers qualifi

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Now we're not suggesting that you're a lawbreaker, but if you're a social networker and you'd like to know where speedtraps are – for no reason at all – then Escort might be able to help. Makers of the Passport line of detectors, Escort has started a mobile app-supported network called Escort Live that features Bluetooth notifications.

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Florida is facing a class-action lawsuit from drivers who have been ticketed for attempting to warn other motorists of hidden speed traps. According to WTSP 10 News, Eric Campbell was recently cited for just that, despite the fact that there is no law against using one's headlights to communicate with other drivers. The officer who ticketed Campbell used Florida State Statute 316.2397, even though the courts ruled that the police were wrongfully applying the law to crack down on vehicle-to-vehic

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For the average motorist, dealing with law enforcement usually amounts trying to get out of a traffic citation. So it's understandable that we sometimes are less than thrilled to see them on our roads. But keep in mind that the police are the first responders whenever there is trouble, and the men and women in blue are looking out for our best interests more than many of us realize.

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Running into a speed trap is a gut-wrenching feeling. Regardless of whether you are going two or 20 mph over the limit, you always have to glance in your mirror to make sure Johnny Law isn't on your tail. In that spirit, a Lakeway, Texas resident is fed up with the traps in his town and has decided to fight back against them all by his lonesome. Lance Mitchell, co-founder of the website SpeedTrapAhead.org, is taking to the streets and warning other motorists about nearby speed traps.

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Earlier this week, the ink dried on a deal for Navteq to acquire Trapster, the speed trap and road hazard tracking company that makes GPS apps for iPhone, Android and Blackberry. Navteq's interest in Trapster is obvious: One of the world's largest mapping and sat-nav software companies needs more crowd-sourced traffic information. With over nine million downloads, Trapster has both the reach and programming knowledge to expand the depth and breadth of the firm's traffic data.

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Researchers at the Naval Postgraduate School and the University of California, Santa Cruz may have found a new use for most drivers' worst nightmare. William Fox and John Vesecky have discovered that with a little tweaking, a run-of-the-mill radar gun can become an instrument for detecting suicide bombers. The duo found that at a specific frequency, the gun can pick up on patterns of looped wire typically used in bomber suicide vests. Testing is in the beginning stages right now, but thus far, t

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How not to ride your Kawasaki - Click above to view the video after the jump

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