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Passenger might one day go the way of landline telephones. Everyone was dependent upon them until, somehow, mobile phones became ubiquitous and landlines began fading away. Maurie Cohen, associate professor in the Department of Chemistry and Environment Science at the New Jersey Institute of Technology, says the analogy is a good one.


The mood at the 2013 North American International Auto Show has been more than upbeat for automakers. Lots of new models and concept cars have been unveiled and automakers think it will be a good year for a solid sales increase. Quartz writer Tim Fernholz looked at it from another angle, raising some big questions. What if this post-economic crisis renaissance is short lived? Is the world approaching "peak car" – when demand for cars declines? And will the role of manufacturers change from


Let's just say the smart money's on smart transportation. A recent study by MarketsAndMarkets found that global spending on so-called smart-transportation initiatives will quadruple to more than $102 billion in 2018 from almost $27 billion this year. Spending on communication systems that do everything from conveying local traffic levels to providing parking and traffic-ticketing information, all of which will be designed to make the roads safer and more efficient, will jump by about 24 percent


Automakers will be playing a much different role in cities in the near future, according to Toyota. Manufacturing cars and marketing them through their dealer networks may take a backseat to smart transportation and mobility. See also: Daimler's Car2go.

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