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Connective technology on permanent exhibit at Computer History Museum

At four years old, the original Ford SYNC is already a relic in the rapidly changing subculture of automotive connectivity. And it's being recognized as such.

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Lots of things about commuting are aggravating. High on that list is the productivity that gets smothered while you're snarled in traffic. You can only bang along on the steering wheel to Clyde Stubblefield for so long before you start getting antsy to convert the stop-and-go into some forward momentum on a project. Now, what if the whole commute could be as comfortable as the leather seats in an Infiniti G37 while you spent the entire ride with your nose buried in your laptop?

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When a news article about a new car starts with this line – "Vehicle currently in development requires no fuel, no external charging" – it makes us worry. We're not exactly big fans of vaporware made of unobtanium. So, it is with skepticism that we read about a new compressed air car being developed by the team at Club Auto Sport in Silicon Valley.

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Photo of downtown Indianapolis by Serge Melki. Licensed under CC license 2.0.

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San Jose Mercury News asked an interesting question in a recent article: "Silicon Valley is already the capital of the world's high-tech industry. Is it also becoming the Detroit of the electric car industry?" The San Jose Mercury News article includes an interview with Shai Agassi of Project Better Place (based in San Carlos, California) who is known for calling his battery exchange start up Google-like. "In the valley, we know how to do technology disruption. We know how to do business models,

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Have we been looking in all the wrong places for a solution to our energy crisis? Writer Stan Beer writes a short history of Tesla Motors and the Tesla Roadster (which should be familiar to readers of this site), and sees the benefit the Silicon Valley crowd can give to all of us who drive. Even though the energy industry has been looking for new energy sources using scientific methods for decades, it's Silicon Valley engineers who might be leading the way to a greener future, he says. "Forget g

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