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A state trooper in Ohio is being hailed as a hero, for saving the life of a trucker who crashed off a freeway embankment in April.


Gregg Godfrey jumped 166 feet in a semi truck to set a new record for the stunt. While it looked easy from the outside, from inside Godfrey clearly felt the impact when the big rig returned to Earth.


NHTSA is publishing its final mandate to add electronic stability control to semi trucks and large buses. The rule takes effect for big rigs in two years. Depending on size, buses get three or four years to comply.


Motorists in England have one more way to worry about getting stopped by the police this spring. The cops are using an unmarked semi to look down on drivers and check for any offenses, like using a cell phone or texting.


The four occupants of a minivan in Michigan were in for a terrifying ride early in the morning on January 7. Their minivan got lodged under the back of a semi's trailer, and the vehicle was drug 16 miles along Interstate 75. During that time, the driver was on the phone with 911 but couldn't exactly say where the stricken van was because of the snowy conditions.


It's not unusual to see a grown man hitch his pickup truck to another grown man's pickup truck in an attempt to, we assume, prove their chosen engine, brand or tires are better than the other as they face in different directions and start pulling. What is unusual, however, is to see one such pickup truck hitched up to a massive big rig.


Nobody should be shocked that a big, heavy vehicle like a semi truck takes a longer distance to stop than the average passenger car; it's just basic physics. However, this BMW X5 driver seemingly has a major problem grasping the concept, and it results in some serious damage to the back of his SUV.


Police still on the lookout for oblivious driver

A motorcyclist in Brazil avoided being crushed by an oblivious truck driver with some Hollywood stuntman moves earlier this month.


A lot of drivers hate seeing semis on the freeway because of their intimidating size and slow speed, but big rigs are absolutely vital to moving goods around the country. The US is on the road to a major trucking crisis, though. A recent analysis from Business Insider finds that we aren't producing nearly enough new drivers to fill all the needed seats. By 2022, the shortfall could reach 239,000 people.


When it comes to diesel trucks, the good old days weren't so good. Go back a quarter-century, for instance. Back then, a single diesel-powered truck was throwing off about 60 times the emissions a typical "clean diesel" truck does today. Cough.


10.7 MPG doesn't sound like a lot, but 5.8 MPG used to be standard

Think 10 miles per gallon, and your mind may harken back to muscle cars along the line of the General Lee from The Dukes of Hazzard. Apply that figure to a semi-truck, though, and we're talking actual fuel-efficiency gains. That's what the four-year-old SuperTruck program shot for, and two of its four teams have already hit that goal.


With the debate about how to fund the US interstate system already raging, there may be another big highway controversy on the horizon. The US Department of Transportation might slow down some of the vehicles on the nation's roads by mandating speed governors on semi trucks.


Based on studies conducted last year, the National Transportation Safety Board has sent seven recommendations to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration "to improve the safety of tractor-trailers." The suggestions range from changing actual physical components on tractor-trailers, like adding protection along the sides of trailers to keep cars from going under them, to recording VIN information on trailers - which isn't currently collected - in accident reports.


Sales of natural-gas powered big rigs could jump as much as fivefold this year as falling prices for both natural gas and the carbon fuel tanks required for such trucks come down, the Wall Street Journal says.


Semi-trucks and their drivers are the lifeblood of our economy, hauling all the goods we use on a daily basis. A group of such truckers have decided to stage a protest against many of the current practices of our government. This weekend, the Ride for the Constitution (formerly called Truckers to Shut Down America) will lead a convoy of trucks to Interstate 495 around Washington, D.C. where they will drive 55 miles per hour taking up all lanes of traffic.


Dash cams have caught some pretty amazing events on camera, as the unforgettable sights of the meteor that exploded over Chelyabinsk, Russia proved in February. As another example, a trucker driving through Greensburg, Indiana, had his dash cam rolling when another semi truck caught major air over a freeway before crashing down in a ball of flames. (Some understandably foul language makes the video Not Safe For Work, so be sure to turn the volume down if you don't have headphones.) Fortunately,


Driver jumped into ocean to avoid capture

A joy ride through Honolulu ended in the warm waters off of Waikiki beach.


Here's a pro tip: if you happen to have stolen a semi truck and proceeded to crash it into a number of cars on an interstate, do yourself a favor and don't blame the escapade on zombies. That's exactly what 19-year-old Jerimiah Hartline did after he bounced his pilfered a big rig off of a number of vehicles in Temecula, CA. Hartline told the police he was attempting to flee from zombies when the accident happened, but that didn't stop law enforcement from charging him with a rash of offenses, in


The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety is always looking for new ways to make America's highways safer, and this latest test checks out the crashworthiness of one of the most overlooked vehicles on the road: tractor trailers. Pointing out design flaws inherent in semi trailers during rear-end collisions, the IIHS performed three different tests on eight of the most popular semi trailers on the market including a full-width impact, a 50-percent overlap (where only half of the car makes contac


What in the world is the vehicle you see above? Well, um... yeah. We have no idea. According to the video description from YouTube, however, it's a modified Jeep Wrangler, and it comes from the same person who created the equally insane side-by-side merged Wrangler you saw here.


Volvo, the Swedish automaker long-known for its safety innovations, has taken to applying its passenger car safety systems to commercial semi trucks.

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