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77It's been 5 years since Cash For Clunkers, was it a success? [w/poll]

CARS set out to kill two birds with one stone: jumpstart slow automobile sales and get a large number of older cars off the road.

AddChina extends vehicle scrappage scheme, increases maximum bonus

China has announced the extension of the country's vehicle scrappage scheme for 2010. Motorists will be able to trade in cars that are considered "highly pollutant" and receive a state subsidy worth between 5,000 yuan (about $730) and 18,000 yuan ($2,600), which is a significant increase over last year's maximum of 6,000 yuan. A "highly polluting" car is either a gasoline car that doesn't qualify for the first tier of Chinese emission regulations (e.g., early VW Santanas) or diesels that don't q

AddUK "clunker" scrappage scheme extended, expanded

Cash for Clunkers was a success in the U.S., but it's done and over with here. Over in the UK, their version of the old-for-new deal, the scrappage scheme, will be extended to include an additional 100,000 vehicles. The announcement was made today by Lord Mandelson. The basics of the UK plan are to offer new car buyers £2,000 off if they trade in a vehicle that is at least eight years old (this is a change, as the limit had been 10 years). Unlike in the U.S., where C4C ran out of money qui

AddEuropean scrapping schemes driving small car sales

2009 Ford Fiesta - Click above for high-res image gallery

AddHyundai reports 4,000 scrap car trades in UK, reveals some surprises

Governments all over the world have introduced Cash-For-Clunkers-style programs that are nothing if not controversial. While the stated intent of each of these schemes is to increase new car sales and remove older, dirtier and less fuel efficient vehicles from the road, some powerful organizations have voiced concerns that untold numbers of classic machinery may be lost forever for no good reason. Could it be that both sides are right? New car buyers in the UK are reportedly flocking to Hyundai

AddSpain announces €2,000 scrappage plan

Following the in the successful footsteps of France's €1,500, Germany's €2,500 and Britain's £2,000 vehicle scrapping programs, Spain's Prime Minister José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero has announced a €2,000 scrappage plan to stimulate that country's auto industry and remove old cars from Spanish roads. Under the plan, the Spanish government will throw in €500 if the country's many regions match that figure and automakers add €1,000 more. This means that a

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