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That's the question we'll have to face before self-driving cars hit critical mass.

Science takes a look at how people feel about autonomous cars making decisions about what to do in an accident.

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Thanks to a 1971 law, New York is the only state in the country that requires drivers to keep at least one hand on the steering wheel while driving.

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The car maker's R&D arm is close to signing a deal for not only Boston Dynamics, but also Google's Japanese robotics company, Schaft.

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The new Toyota Prius goes farther on a gallon of gas than any vehicle Consumer Reports has ever tested.

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The machines will speed up intel gathering on researchers' crops.

The latest idea is to send drones up to scout out the best location to plant sorghum for biofuel production.

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Patterns show that the move to cleaner energy would be quick if there was a concerted effort.

The common wisdom that moving away from dirty fossil fuels will take ages is flat-out wrong, says professor Benjamin Sovacool.

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Stanford university's uBots have pulled off a feat that makes ants look like slackers.

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The students performing research with Stanford University's Audi TTS test rig "Shelley" (not to be confused with Audi's own self-driving race cars) are getting a kick out of the numbers generated by the machine.

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UCLA scientists inject silicon carbide nanoparticles into a magnesium zinc alloy. The result is a metal with 'record breaking' strength and stiffness-to-weight.

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Elon Musk joins with others in the tech community to donate $1B to create an open source AI project.

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The Total Is Far Less Than The Sum Of Its Parts

A British researcher used survey data to identify the most pleasing car parts. And then he compiled them into a heinous composite image.

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Scientists at the University of Rochester develop a process for making metal so hydrophobic that water is forcefully repelled from its surface. Since the microscopic and nanoscale pattern in the metal is etched into the surface, it won't degrade like chemical coatings.

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Every corner of human endeavor has its researchers, and that includes activities that we might think are just supposed to be fun for kids, like pinewood derbies. In case you don't know, a pinewood derby where kids build a car out of a block of wood, add some nails for axles and plastic wheels and then race them head-to-head on a length of track with an elevated starting line. It's all about kids having fun with gravity and little chunks of timber.

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Proving that there is still something to be learned on television these days, National Geographic Channel recently introduced a new series called Duck Quacks Don't Echo. On the first episode of this science/comedy show, host Michael Ian Black proposes the idea that a truck can be supported with a ceramic coffee mug under each wheel – yes, he says that the entire weight of a truck can be balanced on just four coffee mugs.

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For out there who's freaked out that the electromagnetic waves from a hybrid or plug-in vehicle will throw off pacemakers and cause heart attacks, go ahead and breathe easy: that ain't gonna happen.

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Our sister site keeps up with the plainly-visible automated machines that are precursors to The Robot Apocalypse. But what about the microscopic machines that the T900s will be working with? At right in the picture above is a Top Fuel dragster. To the left is a nanodragster; the red guys in the foreground are the front wheels, and the chassis runs to the rear axle and wheels.

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Dung Beetles and your driving will soon have something in common – Click above to watch video

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Parallel parking isn't difficult, but we have generally found ways to make it so. Between cars that almost kinda park for you to those with video game displays that turn parking into a Microsoft Flight Simulator landing attempt to the automated cars that park themselves (a frickin' robot! To park!), getting a car into a space couldn't be more complex.

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While the automobile's total impact on the environment remains up for discussion, it's apparently pretty clear that cars and frogs don't really mix. Well, not if you're a male frog trying to get your croak on, at least. Scientists in Melbourne have found that due to traffic and machinery, a male frog's call can't be heard at great distances by female frogs. That's cutting down on the amount of frog sex to be had, and that, in turn, is cutting down on the number of frogs.

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