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The Takata airbag recall is about to get a lot bigger, as the Japanese supplier is reportedly preparing to comply with an order by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to expand its region-specific recall to a nationwide campaign. According to Reuters, that will add millions of airbags to the disturbingly large supply of faulty units the company has already recalled.

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NHTSA opens timeliness query into company's handling of defective latches

The federal agency charged with keeping motorists safe on U.S. roads is investigating whether child car-seat manufacturer Graco delayed in recalling millions of defective car seats.

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The impact of 2014 – henceforth known as Year of the Recalls – will have long-ranging consequences on the auto industry. One of the biggest changes, though, might not be in the way manufacturers inform the government of pending recalls or in the way Uncle Sam punishes automakers that violate its rules, but in the ability to sell cars with pending recalls. And strangely enough, the charge is being led by an automaker.

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"It's about some of the biggest crises in history. It's about who did it right and who did it wrong." – Jason Vines

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There has been a steady march of progress in automotive safety over the years, evolving from the initial introduction of seat belts and padded dash surfaces to airbags and anti-lock brakes, and, more recently, to some of today's vehicles that actively try to avoid a crash. Unfortunately, knowing about all of that advancement only makes the incredibly poor performance of the Indian-market Datsun Go in a recent crash test by Global NCAP that much more terrifying to watch.

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The debate over wearable tech like Google Glass continues to rage, with questions still being raised about the safety of using the technology while driving. Now, a new study from the University of California, San Francisco, is claiming that not only is Google Glass dangerous to drivers, but it poses a real threat to pedestrians, as well.

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A few months ago, we reported that Aston Martin was in danger of running afoul of new US safety regulations that could force it to take some of its most popular models off the market. The automaker, its dealers and – according to the overwhelming results of our informal online pole – you yourselves reasoned that the constricting regulations were unfair to a small-scale, niche automaker like Aston Martin. And the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration evidently agrees, grantin

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While the roads might be getting just a little safer for motorcycle riders, their two-wheeled compatriots on bicycles appear not to be so lucky. A recent study sponsored by the Governors Highway Safety Association found that annual cycle deaths in the US were up 16 percent from 621 in 2010 to 722 in 2012. In the same period, fatalities for motorists increased only one percent.

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October 31 is one of the worst days for pedestrian deaths, car thefts and reports of vandalism

Halloween is consistently one of the worst holidays to be on the street. October 31 sees a huge share of pedestrian deaths, car thefts and car vandalism.

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America's well-publicized weight problem and aging population of baby boomers is collaborating to bring about a change in the humble crash test dummy, as automakers and safety regulators are attempting to build vehicles even better suited to our changing population.

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Redesigned guardrail three times more likely to cause fatal crash

Trinity Industries, makers of the ET-Plus, has been found guilty of defrauding the federal government under the False Claims Act. Specifically, the company was accused of making a design change to its product and not advising the Federal Highway Administration about the revision for seven years.

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Ford has issued a small – but significant – recall for one of its spotlight cars: the 2015 Mustang.

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The highways in Virginia may look a lot different in in the coming weeks depending on the results of safety tests on guardrails there. The Commonwealth is demanding new crash evaluations on the end terminals of the ET-Plus guardrails (not necessarily pictured above) supplied by Trinity Industries, by October 24, according to The New York Times. If state officials observing the analysis aren't happy with the results, then the product could be banned from the roads there and possibly even removed.

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423k Lexus Models In US Affected By Fuel Delivery Issue

UPDATE: Toyota is now announcing specifically which models are covered under its fuel pipe recall in the US. The company is repairing about 423,000 Lexus models that include the 2007-2010 LS, 2006-2011 GS, 2006-2011 IS, 2010 IS C and 2008-2010 IS-F. The automaker says that it isn't aware of any fires, crashes, injuries or fatalities caused by this problem.

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The recall affects 2,432 vehicles, though only 138 had actually reached consumers.

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Different countries have different safety standards, but most of them revolve around a similar set of tests: front impact, side impact, offset impact, rollover... the usual. But Sweden has its own test. It's called the Moose Test (or the Elk Test), and it's unique to Scandinavia: a car has to be able to avoid a theoretical antlered mammal on the road while traveling at 43.5 miles per hour and return to its previous course without flipping over. The Jeep Grand Cherokee ran afoul of the uniquely N

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The deaths of Ayrton Senna and Dale Earnhardt revolutionized safety in top-flight motorsports. And while we continue to mourn their passing, the truth is that the safety changes made after their deaths have saved lives. Now, Jules Bianchi's severe head injury is reigniting the safety controversy in Formula One.

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More than 108,000 Seattleites safely commute on foot or by public transportation each day

A recent study by Liberty Mutual Insurance found Seattle to be the safest city in America for pedestrians. The Emerald City has 108,000 residents traveling by foot or bike everyday, and less than ten pedestrian deaths each year. While a crunchy west coast city topping the list isn't overly shocking, the rest of the safest cities may surprise you.

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Cop calls generous act "the easiest 50 bucks I ever spent"

A Michigan cop who pulled over a car last week for an unrestrained child decided to go above and beyond the call of duty by buying the struggling mother a car seat, rather than give her a ticket.

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Texas A&M smash trucks for science and safety

Researchers at Texas A&M Transportation Institute are building a better barrier by crashing a lot of big trucks.

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A new report from the Department of Transportation's Office of the Inspector General has revealed yet another fiasco in highway funding. No, it's not a misuse of federal funds. Instead, it's a complete and total lack of use for government monies.

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