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Ron Gettelfinger has been in the United Auto Workers for 44 years, the last eight of those years in the role of president. He's taken his share of lumps from the people he faced across the table and his own constituents, but he's led the UAW through some of the toughest years its faced in a decades, summed up by his quote, "We did what we had to do to get to tomorrow." And now he's out, with his chosen successor, Bob King, voted in by a landslide to replace him.

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The UAW ain't what it used to be. The organized labor outfit has seen membership fall off over the past ten years, and as a result, it's cutting staff at both its domestic and international headquarters. Last year's membership figures were pegged at a little more than 355,000 workers – down from over 700,000 in 2000, and a fraction of the 1.5 million members the UAW boasted in the mid '70s. To cope with the resultant dip in cash flow, the union has nixed around 130 positions overseas and s

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Yesterday, Toyota and Tesla announced that the two companies would be collaborating on electric vehicle development. Tesla will be taking over the NUMMI factory in Fremont, California, which was recently closed. Now, the United Auto Workers is urging Toyota to hire union workers to operate the plant, giving jobs back to the people who were rendered unemployed after the NUMMI shutdown.

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Yesterday, Toyota and Tesla announced that the two companies would be collaborating on electric vehicle development. Tesla will be taking over the NUMMI factory in Fremont, California, which was recently closed. Now, the United Auto Workers is urging Toyota to hire union workers to operate the plant, giving jobs back to the people who were rendered unemployed after the NUMMI shutdown.

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The United Auto Workers is many things to many people. To some, it's the reason why all of our manufacturing hasn't been shipped over to China. To others, UAW added costs are the reason why American cars can't compete with imports. Whatever your opinion, the facts are that the UAW is not nearly as strong as it once was. Back in 1979 the UAW claimed 1.5 million members on its rosters. In 2008 that number shrank to just 431,000 souls.

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Ron Gettelfinger, the United Auto Workers' (UAW) president during the recent tumult, is moving on from his post, and has thrown his support behind Bob King. King is currently a vice president in the union and manages the relationship with Ford.

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Big surprise, the United Auto Workers union does not intend to be majority owner of the New New Chrysler for very long. Outgoing UAW president Ron Gettelfinger confirmed in a press conference yesterday that the union's Voluntary Employee Beneficiary Association (VEBA) will likely sell part or all of its 55% stake in the newly formed automaker once its stock appreciates, that is, if its stock appreciates.

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Earlier this morning, United Auto Workers president Ron Gettelfinger held a press conference in which he pointed the finger of blame back at Senate Republicans, particularly ones from Southern states in which many foreign-owned auto assembly plants are located, for the failed attempt last night to pass the Auto Rescue/Bailout Bill in the Senate. As we mentioned earlier, negotiations fell apart over the issue of wage parity, or what Senator Bob Corkey (R-Tenn.) called "competitive wages".

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As you read this, there are about 3,000 unionized workers -- down from about 15,000 two years ago -- employed by the Detroit 3 getting paid, despite the fact that they aren't working. While it's nice for America's automakers to have access to a talent-pool of available workers, it's also a major financial drain on an industry that's already reeling from a distinct lack of profits. And with new cutbacks and layoffs being announced almost daily, these "job banks" are increasingly tough to justify,

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Ron Gettelfinger's basically saying "it's not our fault" when discussing the state of Detroit's automakers. Rather than admit that the UAW's plum labor agreements and contentious negotiations have contributed to the current gloomy situation, the United Auto Workers head man says that the economic downturn is to blame for everything, and that Congress should approve loans to the auto industry, saying "We cannot afford to...see this industry collapse." You've got to love that black and white logic

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In an announcement that should be anything but shocking to anyone who even remotely follows the auto industry, United Auto Workers head Ron Gettelfinger says he and the UAW would be against any merger between automakers that would reduce either company's workforce. Considering that the Union's main job as of late has been safeguarding the jobs of its members, we would expect nothing less than an all-out war between Gettelfinger and the automakers involved, if such a merger were to take place, as

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Once you have cut everyone, who is left to cut? That's the problem facing GM, according to UAW President Ron Gettelfinger. The General has already harvested the low hanging fruit with previous buyouts, but they're embarking on another round to try and further reduce labor costs. We've already covered the specifics of GM's latest buyout offer that attempts to sweeten the enticement to leave so that cheaper labor can be brought in. The new offer was made to 74,000 employees, and Gettelfinger estim

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Rick Wagoner may be Motor Trend's most powerful person of the year, but Ron Gettelfinger deserves significant props for what he achieved over the course of the last 365 days. Automotive News has named the president of the UAW its Person of the Year, which is a fitting choice considering that Gettelfinger somehow managed to broker a compromise between domestic automakers and his union workers that satisfied both parties.

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The UAW has already gone on record as supporting the newer (and lower) bipartisan bill which would raise Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards by 28 to 40 percent. This alternative bill would require cars to average fuel economy of 36 miles per gallon by 2022 with light trucks being required to meet 30 miles per gallon by 2025. This standard is being hailed as tough but reachable, while other bills are being deemed impossible, despite the differences being only a few miles per gallon h

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Two years ago, the UAW gave some health care concessions to struggling GM and Ford in an effort to help the Detroit giants save billions of dollars and stay afloat. At the time, Chrysler was relatively well-off and so the union rejected a similar package for them. UAW President Ron Gettelfinger says that it's time to make up for that omission. Since 2005, the Chrysler Group went from a profit of $1.8 billion, to a loss of $618 million last year, and on to a $1.98 billion loss so far this year. G

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Last week we told you that DaimlerChrysler's Rüdiger Grube was heading to New York to visit with potential suitors for the Chrysler Group. And it appears he was a man on a mission. It seems that a close source has told news outlets that a sale could be wrapped up by as early as May. Although talks are ongoing and nothing is definite, it looks like at least one of the bidders has met the company's expectations in principle. Those bidders included Blackstone Group, Centerbridge Capital Partne

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Call it a case of "He said, he said." A Toyota spokesman says the Japanese automaker doesn't see an interest in unionizing among workers at its production facility in Kentucky, while UAW spokespeople say workers are showing more interest than ever in forming a union. So which is it? Could be a bit of both. UAW membership has been dropping nationwide, but the organization still has an undeniably powerful place in the industry. With more foreign automakers building plants in the States, particular

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Chrysler no doubt felt a little burned by the United Auto Workers Union after being told it would receive no concessions for health care like the ones offered to both General Motors and Ford. At the time, the UAW cited the Chrysler Group's better financial health as the reason for the snubbing, but apparently the automaker's $1.5 billion loss last quarter and its expected loss of $1.2 billion for the year is enough to convince UAW president Ron Gettelfinger (shown at right with then Chrysler Gro

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The UAW on Wednesday jumped on rumors that it had reopened talks with Chrysler. According to a piece in The Detroit News, UAW spokesman Roger Kerson said there was no meeting over one of the biggest sticking points, health care, as was rumored elsewhere. Although the UAW has reached health care agreements with GM and Ford this year, they broke off talks with Chrysler over this issue in September, likely because Chrysler wasn't in as dire of straights as Ford and GM. Chrysler spokesman Mike Aberl

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If there is anything the Rick Wagoner has learned during his time at GM, it's that you never piss off the unions. That morsel of knowledge might be something that Carlos Ghosn has to consider now that the United Auto Workers (UAW) has come out in opposition of a possible merger of General Motors and Renault/Nissan.

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Nobody saw this one coming... Ron Gettelfinger, ran unopposed and was reelected as the president of the United Auto Workers (UAW) at its 34th Constitutional Convention in Las Vegas. Alongside him on the slate were five vice presidents, three of which are expected to be named as liaisons to Ford, Chrysler and General Motors, as well as a secretary-treasurer.

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