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General Motors and Ford can have all the success they please, but it doesn't seem like America's two largest manufacturers are going to topple Toyota in the first half of 2013. According to Reuters, Toyota moved 4.91 million vehicles in the first six months of 2013, representing a 1.1-percent drop from the same period in 2012.

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Who Killed the Electric Car? asked the title of the 2006 Chris Paine documentary about General Motors' dearly departed EV1. Well, Reuters appears to be doing its best to fit that bill.

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We're learning again that if you take on the Chevrolet Volt, you also take on Bob Lutz.

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Innovative, fun and fuel-efficient, the Volt suffers from consumer apprehension about any EV tech

General Motors is losing as much $49,000 each time it sells a Chevrolet Volt extended range electric vehicle, according to analysis done by Reuters news service. The chief reason is the high start-up costs of the car and the so-far disappointing response from consumers.

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The price of a gallon of crude may have dropped by $16 in the past month, but for the most part, gas prices haven't followed suit. In fact, the nationwide average hit $4 per gallon just last week, or $1.10 higher than it was at this time in 2010.

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The price of a gallon of crude may have dropped by $16 in the past month, but for the most part, gas prices haven't followed suit. In fact, the nationwide average hit $4 per gallon just last week, or $1.10 higher than it was at this time in 2010.

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Yesterday, Toyota and Tesla announced that the two companies would be collaborating on electric vehicle development. Tesla will be taking over the NUMMI factory in Fremont, California, which was recently closed. Now, the United Auto Workers is urging Toyota to hire union workers to operate the plant, giving jobs back to the people who were rendered unemployed after the NUMMI shutdown.

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Yesterday, Toyota and Tesla announced that the two companies would be collaborating on electric vehicle development. Tesla will be taking over the NUMMI factory in Fremont, California, which was recently closed. Now, the United Auto Workers is urging Toyota to hire union workers to operate the plant, giving jobs back to the people who were rendered unemployed after the NUMMI shutdown.

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According to Reuters, a group of researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology are working on what they think is a more logical ethanol solution for our impending fuel crisis. Instead of using ethanol as a primary fuel or an additive, we could potentially see more realistic fuel-saving improvements across a wider spectrum if we implemented a system on cars that injected ethanol in small quantities when the engine is under heavy load.

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For the last three years, the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Transporation have ranked 20 companies that they feel offer the best benefits for commuters and for three years Intel has come out on top. Why shouldn't they? They offer their employees vanpools, subsidies for public transportation, showers and storage for those who bike or run and even a dry-cleaner to lessen the demand for driving. And what if you could measure your commute times in milliseconds? In 2005, a who

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This'll teach me to stare at news feeds all morning. At 7:39 AM EDT, the Dow Jones Newswire reported that the Organization for Petroleum Exporting Countries agreed to cut oil production by 1 million barrels per day (about 3 percent). As a result, early electronic trading saw the price of crude oil futures rise back up above $60 per barrel before the New York Mercantile Exchange rang its opening bell. At the time of this writing, it was at a $1.45 increase.

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Last Friday, the Wall Street Journal published an interview with President Bush that focused on energy policy. You can just about guess what he says without even reading the article. These two reports from Reuters and AFX (via Forbes), however, each take a bit of a different approach with the interview, so we're off to the source.

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Reuters reports that yesterday the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposed a "renewable fuels standard" in order to comply with a 2005 law mandating refiners and marketers to raise biofuel production to 7.5 billion gallons in 2012. As reference, production for 2006 is projected at 4 billion gallons. Renewable fuels currently make up 2.78 percent of the nation's gas sales. The EPA's proposed standard would raise that to 3.71 percent next year.

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Seventy bucks a barrel for crude oil is the new norm, and the high price is driving interest in alternative energy sources on the trading floor as well as the gas pump. On the Chicago Board of Trade, a Reuters commentary says, soy oil, a byproduct from turning soybeans into animal feed, is looking more and more like a safe bet for future profits.

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Scott Sklar, over at Renewable Energy Access, synthesizes three recent polls that ask Americans their opinions on energy and how it affects them. His point is that the three polls, when taken together, show an "American consensus" on energy attitudes. The New York Times/CBS News, Reuters and Pew Research took the polls, which were conducted or released in April. The highlights, as far as green driving is concerned, are that 90 percent think our lack of energy independence jeopardizes national se

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