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AddRepublican control of Congress could affect US biofuel policy, Uber and Lyft

To Be Sure, The Future Is Unclear

Green transportation issues were not at the top of this year's midterm elections in the US, but the sweeping Republican victories – and probably new Senate Majority leader Mitch McConnell – could affect at least some aspects of how we get around without using as many resources as we used to.

44Rolling Coal: America's Political Divide Reaches The Roads [w/videos]

Dirty trucks a form of political protest

Rolling coal isn't always mere indiscriminate harassment, but a form of grassroots political protest against President Obama and perceived burdensome federal regulations.

AddIs Tesla Motors becoming a Republican darling?

The general political attitudes taken by the left and right in the US are, sadly, divided on the issue of fuel efficient vehicles. Broadly speaking, Republicans dislike the whole idea (even going to absurd extremes like Newt Gingrich saying that inflating your tires helps Big Oil) while Democrats are in favor. The stereotype even gets in the way of people thinking that the DOE's Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing (ATVM) loan program is an Obama Administration creation. It's not, and was

AddSarah Palin calls Tesla a 'loser,' which 'wounds' CEO Elon Musk

Wasn't it the 2012 presidential race that featured Republican candidates disparaging electric vehicle companies? Well, yes, but that doesn't mean the 2008 vice presidential candidate (and

3Op-Ed: Former GOP Congressman Says 54.5 MPG Rule Is A Good One

New CAFE average will make economy more stable and create new jobs

With election-year headlines trumpeting deep political divisions nationwide and partisan paralysis in Washington, the last thing you might expect to see is a major change in federal energy policy.

AddReport: House panel attempting to block EPA from regulating tailpipe emissions

The Clean Air Act of 2007 gave the Environmental Protection Agency the right to regulate tailpipe emissions due to their dangers to public health. The law also gave states like California the right to set their own emissions policies; a move that could force automakers to meet several different standards in the U.S. alone. That led the federal government to essentially adopt California's standard, resulting in a mandate of 34.1 miles per gallon by 2016.

85Report: House panel attempting to block EPA from regulating tailpipe emissions

The Clean Air Act of 2007 gave the Environmental Protection Agency the right to regulate tailpipe emissions due to their dangers to public health. The law also gave states like California the right to set their own emissions policies; a move that could force automakers to meet several different standards in the U.S. alone. That led the federal government to essentially adopt California's standard, resulting in a mandate of 34.1 miles per gallon by 2016.

AddHigh-speed rail projects facing massive cuts

With Republicans in control of Congress and the Federal pursestrings, they've got to make good on their campaign promise to bring spending back in line. Near the top of their cut list is the proposed national high-speed rail program, and during tonight's State of the Union, President Obama will attempt to assuage fears that the GOP axe will slice deep into the country's infrastructure.

AddA look into the politics of plug-in vehicles

With the U.S. mid-term elections over and control of the House of Representatives shifting over to Republican control, it's worth trying to figure out what the legislative future holds for plug-in vehicle support. The short answer, as best we can tell: it's complicated, but there are still a lot of people who want to see plug-ins on the road. Here are a few things to keep in mind:

40Report: GM's planned purchase of AmeriCredit questioned by senator

We've decided to stop trying to guess what General Motors will do before its IPO – which might come next month or later this year or early next year. What we do know is that GM has wanted to secure a captive finance arm before an IPO, a process that looked unlikely, then fell off the radar entirely, and then, BAM!, GM whips out $3.5 billion to buy AmeriCredit. That has made at least one senator do a double-take, asking whether spending that much money and loaning to the subprime market is

AddSen. Bill Frist uses Cash for Clunkers, junks Suburban for Prius

2010 Toyota Prius - Click above for high-res image gallery

AddHow do you get a Republican to buy a hybrid?

The new Honda Insight is supposed to be the "hybrid for everyone," but does that include Republicans? A new Wall Street Journal article runs down the well-known tale of how, mostly, the people who drive hybrids are on the left side of American politics (remember this?). From there, Democratic political consultant Mark Penn asks his big question: "Where Are the Republican Hybrid Buyers?" From the article:

80Aw Snap! Congressional Democrats undercut compromise bailout bill

Wow, what an amazing piece of political theater that just went down. As we reported, four senators from auto producing state (two Democrats and two Republicans) led by Michigan Senator Carl Levin have reached an agreement on a compromise bailout bill for automakers. They were set to announce details of the compromise bill at 2:30PM, but before they could, a team of Congressional Democrats led by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid walked into the room in which the pr

20How about a Republican debate at the Detroit Auto Show?

Looks like the '08 Detroit Show could be a lot more interesting than normal, as the Michigan GOP is working to have NAIAS be the venue for (yet another) presidential debate, this one featuring the Republican candidates, obviously. The idea would be to highlight the Detroit automakers and to have the debate take a decidedly Michigan-oriented focus. Have there been too many debates already? Yes, for both sides. It's ridiculous, and they seem to get progressively worse with each new one. That said,

5Don't vote party lines in '08, vote brand loyalty

Based on what most of our presidential candidates have said so far, it's too early to tell what sets them apart. So if we can't learn anything from what they say, maybe we can glean ideas on their governance from what they drive. Of thirteen candidates noted, seven Democrats have nine cars, and six Republicans also have nine cars. Of those 18 cars, five are hybrids -- three of them domestic hybrids. There are 7 SUV's (well, 6 and a Jeep Wrangler). Mitt Romney, estimated to be the richest candida

19The political winds may be shifting in Detroit

The political alliances in the Motor City have historically been rather black-and-white, with the UAW lining up alongside Democrats and management favoring the Republicans. Yes, one can find exception to these stereotypes, but the above comes as close as one can to describing 40-some years of voting behavior in one sentence. But the times are changing, and traditional alliances between the political parties and their supporters in the auto industry are increasingly stressed.

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