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The number of vehicle deaths in the US has fallen since the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) was created in 1966, even as the number of drivers on the road has greatly increased and the number of miles they drive has increased exponentially more. But a Senate panel is debating whether NHTSA is moving fast enough to curb vehicle deaths, The Detroit News reports.


About 100 children and over 200 adults die every year because drivers accidentally back over them. It's a sad statistic that the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration feels can be prevented if all new vehicles come standard with backup cameras.


Recently, we received the following question from a reader:


Technology has brought about a great deal of advancements in new vehicles over the last few years. There are some electric nanny aids that many of us do without, but there are others, like rear backup cameras and warning systems, that proponents suggest could save lives. How many? If the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's new findings are any indication, quite a few. In 2007 alone, 221 people were killed when vehicles backed up over them, and 99 of those were children under the age


What other automaker would spend the time and expense of developing a new airbag just because, you know, airbags could be better? The same one who developed a new rail car for the same reason. The Japanese automaker has developed a new airbag it claims will give drivers better protection in accidents. The shaped bag uses a spiral seam to induce more even inflation, which provides a larger surface area and creates uniform pressure around the bag more quickly than in a conventional airbag system.

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