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A Washington Post opinion piece, refuting those who predict the death of electric vehicles - yes, again - explains that regulatory mandates underpin the existence and sales of BEVs, not the price of gas.

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According To Drivers Of The Expensive EV, Fixing Something Can Be Quite A Shock

Green Car Reports says that Tesla Model S owners are finding out just how expensive aluminum can be to fix, with repair estimates like $7,000 to fix "a small dent and scratch" to $45,000 for "minor front-end damage." With aluminum figuring ever more in our automotive future to save weight, this could be the canary in the coal mine for all of us or just opportunistic price gouging.

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According to Bob Lutz, a mid-engine Corvette was on track for production when he was with the company, but a lack of money caused it to fall through the cracks. Now, he thinks there is a good shot of one actually coming to market. The former GM exec lays it all out in a must-read op ed in Road & Track.

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With the punishing set of responsibilities that come with command of three automakers, 60-year-old Carlos Ghosn is arguably the hardest working man in the auto industry. While his capabilities can hardly be doubted, it's quite clear that he can't do this job forever. And that's probably going to be bad news for the Renault-Nissan Alliance he so successfully helms.

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Lada is not well, and it's brought in a Swedish-American GM vet to try and fix things. It's not exactly going smoothly, though.

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Many people use the time around holidays as an opportunity to do something good for the world, whether buying gifts for needy children or volunteering time for a charity. Although, some significant acts of philanthropy take almost no work at all on your part, like donating a vehicle.

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Quiz America's auto enthusiasts about the vehicles they most want to see in the US market, and for every one that doesn't respond with a French hot hatchback or some diesel-powered offering, there'd be at least three that ask for some small, imported pickup truck. That won't happen, though, and we have the Chicken Tax to thank.

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Chances are good that unless you're a city planner or traffic engineer, the number of hours – minutes, even – most people think about the history and design of the sound walls lining America's freeways is roughly zero. The concrete or cinderblock structures turn into a blur at high speeds, and they're specifically designed to blend into the background. If drivers don't notice the barriers, then the designers have done their jobs. However, a new piece from Medium digs deep into the pr

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Millennials are driving less than previous generational groups. It's a reality which America is dealing with at the moment, which automakers are trying their best of overcome and which sociologists are apparently studying with increasing intensity. The question is, why?

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Octogenarian billionaire, briber and Bond villain caricature Bernie Ecclestone is not popular with the fans of the sport he oversees with an iron fist, and somehow, we don't think that's set to change after the 84-year-old gave a pretty wide-ranging interview with Campaign Asia-Pacific.

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Michelin is globally known for two things – tires and food. Yeah, we know, those two are pretty far removed from each other, but the company's history in the former is very nearly as long and storied as its work in the latter.

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We live in a society where more is generally considered better. We want improved fuel economy from our cars, more data from our phones and a better picture from TVs. But when it comes to engineering some roads, giving drivers more room might not actually be an advantage. There's some evidence that switching from the current 12-foot standard for lanes to 10-foot-wide lanes for urban streets could boost safety. The change might potentially mean around 900 fewer fatal crashes each year.

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The old Packard Plant in Detroit is one of the city's icons. All at once, it represents the vibrant history of the Motor City, its rocky past decades and the chance for something new to spring up. Despite the Packard buildings sitting empty for years, there's still life there. Among other things, it's a common spot for artists to practice their work, including Banksy several years ago. However, recent demolitions might bring a final end to the famous spot as we know it and threatens to make the

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Racing drivers live the fast life, but it's not all glory and fame. That's especially true of Randy Lanier – the former professional racing driver was sentenced in 1988 to life without parole on drug trafficking charges. But now he's being released.

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Preston Tucker was one of the great iconoclasts of the post-war automotive industry, and his Tucker 48 attempted a look unlike any car seen before (or since). However, a trial brought by the US Securities and Exchange Commission sunk the company, despite it being found not guilty. Tucker never gave up on the auto business though and went to Brazil in the 1950s to restart things with an all-new sporty design. Now, some newly discovered photos might shed more light on that almost-forgotten model.

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With $10 billion in development costs, the Global Hawk UAV has been an expensive proposition for the US Air Force over the course of its 15-year life. The huge UAV – its wingspan is nearly 30-feet wider than a U-2 spy plane and it's only two feet shorter than an F-16 – has become a critical vehicle for the US military, although as Foxtrot Alpha explains, that significance isn't necessarily due to its reconnaissance abilities.

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The troubles in Ferguson, MO have been well documented, but for every angle CNN and Fox News try to cover, few of them can match the attitude of someone that grew up in the area and fewer still can be presented without the troubling plague of sensationalism.

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Tesla Fever has extended far and wide, winning over critics and everyday enthusiasts alike. The company is rapidly expanding its efforts both in its home market and abroad, but for some of its wealthy fans, that move isn't happening quite fast enough.

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Alongside the F-35 Lightning II fighter, there's hardly a single military program that has been subject to as much criticism as the US Navy's Littoral Combat Ship. The controversial program has resulted in two classes of small surface combatants (shown above, Freedom-class at left and Independence-class at right) along with millions of dollars in budget overruns and production problems.

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Autonomous cars are piloting their way into the wide philosophical sea of ethics. Right now the autonomous cars are unaware of this because the driver's will always comes first, but when we start getting cars that can overrule commands or choose a particular ethical outcome either without or in spite of driver input, we'll have a lot of decisions to make. Which means we have a lot of decisions to start considering right now.

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Today, America's armed forces aren't known for its aircraft carriers, fighter jets, tanks or guns – it's known for its drones. Whether they be Predators, Reapers, Global Hawks or something that takes up slightly less headline space, the US use of drones has been the single most identifying feature of America's military in the past several years.

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