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Researchers at the Naval Postgraduate School and the University of California, Santa Cruz may have found a new use for most drivers' worst nightmare. William Fox and John Vesecky have discovered that with a little tweaking, a run-of-the-mill radar gun can become an instrument for detecting suicide bombers. The duo found that at a specific frequency, the gun can pick up on patterns of looped wire typically used in bomber suicide vests. Testing is in the beginning stages right now, but thus far, t


The fact is that small cars get into more accidents than large and mid-sized cars, and the fatality rates for small cars are about twice as high as their larger siblings. Yet it's the large – and usually expensive and luxurious – cars that get features like collision avoidance technology. That could change soon if TRW Automotive can get car makers to adopts its less expensive collision avoidance radar system.


Bad news, Buckeyes. The Ohio Supreme Court just ruled that a police officer needs nothing more than his or her informed guess on how fast a vehicle is traveling in order to issue a traffic citation. Yep. You can forget the radar gun, LIDAR or even the archaic pacing method. As of right now, officers can merely say that you're exceeding the posted speed limit and you'll be stuck with points on your license and a hefty fine to deal with. If that sounds more crooked than a Jersey car salesman, it g


Up to now, radar detectors have epitomized the ultimate in minimalist design: a couple of buttons or knobs, a couple of LEDs and a few hieroglyphs were all you got. No more. Now you get something that will probably prove just as distracting: a 1.5-inch touchscreen on two of Cobra's newest radar detectors.


It seems as though there may just be a positive side to those unwelcome GPS-based vehicle tracking devices... especially if you are a teenager. Shaun Malone, a 17-year-old California resident, was cited by radar-yielding authorities for driving 62 mph in a 45 mph zone in 2007. Faced with a $194 fine (and some inflating insurance premiums), Shaun's parents fought back arguing their son's vehicle was equipped with a satellite-based tracking device that monitored Shaun's speed – and it showed


Winnipeg authorities are all "Lookie! Crashes are down at the intersections equipped with our spiffy new red-light cameras," but Manitoba Public Insurance and the Winnipeg Sun newspaper are all: "Stop lying!" Winnipeg says its 12 intersections equipped with the electronic sentinels have seen a 37% reduction in crashes since 2002. MPI and the WInnipeg Sun beg to differ, however, saying that insurance claims tell a markedly different, more complete story.


Two new JDM Toyota safety technologies are likely to arrive on future Lexus models in the United States. The first is a system that uses a millimeter-wave radar to detect objects in the vehicle's path. When obstructions are noted, the driver is alerted by an indicator or a sound. If the pending collision is imminent, a pre-crash system activates the brakes, removes slack from the seats belts and then deploys the airbags.


A short while ago we reported about an unknown group called FNAR (Fraccion Nationaliste Armé Révolutionaire) that was bombing speed-control radars in France. The government claims with radars are in use to reduce accidents and to lower pollution levels by forcing speed reduction. Last week, a man aged 31 was seriously wounded when he was manipulating one of these bombs in an apartment in Hauts de Seine, France. The guy said he belonged to the FNAR and the police found a small labor


Apparently, when some motorists see their speed displayed on a radar-assisted light sign, they don't pay much attention (hell, we've seen people speed up to see how high it goes).


Researchers in Germany are developing a vehicle safety system that sounds like something straight out of science-fiction.

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