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Discover how to reduce the false alerts on your radar detector that are caused by adaptive cruise control and anti-collision sensors.


A laser jammer is a device that will make your car invisible to police LiDAR enforcement. Before buying one, here's what you need to know.


A radar detector can be a valuable resource to help you avoid speeding tickets, but the devices can be intimidating to newcomers.


This month's giveaway is a Passport 9500 ix radar and laser detector courtesy of Escort. Not that you would ever break the law by going a few miles per hour over the speed limit, but if you did (by accident, of course), the Passport 9500 ix detector is your best bet for avoiding a ticket.


In the ongoing technology war between cops and speeders, the guys who can't drive 55 have a new trick up their sleeves: Crowdsourcing.


Now we're not suggesting that you're a lawbreaker, but if you're a social networker and you'd like to know where speedtraps are – for no reason at all – then Escort might be able to help. Makers of the Passport line of detectors, Escort has started a mobile app-supported network called Escort Live that features Bluetooth notifications.


Cobra iRadar – Click above for image gallery


Escort PASSPORT iQ – Click above for high-res image gallery


Up to now, radar detectors have epitomized the ultimate in minimalist design: a couple of buttons or knobs, a couple of LEDs and a few hieroglyphs were all you got. No more. Now you get something that will probably prove just as distracting: a 1.5-inch touchscreen on two of Cobra's newest radar detectors.


Thanks to Florida State Senator Steve Oelrich, the Sunshine State could become the second state in the union to ban the use of radar detectors by motorists. Oelrich proposed the bill to the state legistature on Wednesday, which would make the use of radar detectors in the state a secondary traffic infaction punishable by a ticket if the offending motorist were pulled over for another offense.


New Scientist magazine reports that researchers at the University of Tennessee and Batelle Institute have applied for patents on a system that detects the speed of a passing vehicle based on its exhaust note.

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