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Following a directive first created back in 2006, the European Union has passed down a ruling that would force European automakers to find a new refrigerant to use in their vehicle's air conditioners. There's some debate as to the timing of this mandate, as it's no secret that most automakers are in a fight to just remain in business.

It wasn't all that long ago that the auto industry was under fire for its use of ozone-depleting chemicals in its air conditioning systems. To curb those fears, the older R-12 refrigerant was replaced with R-134a refrigerant. Interestingly enough, CO2, long associated with harmful automobile emissions, is being touted as a desirable natural replacement for the chemical substances used today. In fact, the German Automotive Association has already chosen to use CO2 as the next source for automotiv

Even though the older types of refrigerant like Dichlorodifluoromethane (R-12) have been replaced with newer types like Tetrafluoroethane (R-134a), your car's air conditioning system could still be damaging to the environment. While not as harmful as the older refrigerants, recent research suggests that R-134a refrigerant is collecting in our atmosphere and could be contributing to global climate change. Therefore, the Mobile Air Conditioning Society Worldwide (MACS) has issued a press release,

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