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A strike has decimated the London Underground, a service used by some 4 million people each day. The result? 833 miles of traffic jams, according to TomTom.

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The Hong Kong subway system makes $2 billion in annual profit thanks in large part to the fact that it controls the land that its stations are situated on. Fares still support the system's operating costs.

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Several startups in San Francisco are trying to bring a luxury experience to mass transit with fleets of highly upgraded buses that offer things like waiters onboard to deliver snacks. Could these companies be bad for the city, though?

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APTA says the biggest savings are available to NYC residents

Looking to line your pockets with some extra cash? Perhaps it's time to give up driving. A sobering report from the American Public Transportation Association (APTA) says that people using public transit in the 20 cities with the most riders save an average of $848 dollars a month, or $10,181 a year. Riders in New York see the greatest benefit, saving an average of $15,041 from January to December.

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In 2013, Americans took a record 10.7 billion trips on public transit.

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Havana, Cuba is well known for its collection of vintage American cars. But even with a classic Chevrolet or Ford on every corner, personal vehicle ownership on the communist island nation is still out of reach for most citizens. Like many cities where owning vehicles is either impractical or unaffordable (or downright banned), Cuba has a public transit system. Based on this video said to be from Havana, though, we'd imagine walking to be the most comfortable option.

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So, the US metropolitan areas with the largest percentage jump in commuters that bike to work are Portland, Madison, San Francisco and Denver. Now that we've gotten the "no duh" portion of the US Public Interest Research Group's (PIRG) recent study on urban driving habits out of the way, we can dig further into a report that argues that we're about nine years past the year when "peak car" happened.

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For a little over a year Tesla and SpaceX visionary Elon Musk has been talking about a revolutionary new way to travel called Hyperloop. Today he announced his designs in a 57-page document, ending months of speculation by the public and media alike.

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Lately, Elon Musk seems to be challenging every preconceived notion of transportation. First, he took the auto industry by storm when he introduced the electric-powered Tesla Roadster and later the all-electric Model S sedan, dubbed the "automobile of the year" by Automobile Magazine, as well as Motor Trend. Then his company SpaceX became the first privately owned company to send cargo to the International Space Station. #fivemin-widget-blogsmith-image-106296{display:none;} .cke_show_borders #f

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While New York's Penn Station certainly doesn't look like a modern building now, it soon could be the building of the future.

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Public bus systems have changed quite a bit in the past few decades.

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Does no access to public transit mean no jobs? That's the argument that Adie Tomer makes in a report compiled for the Brookings Institution's Metropolitan Policy Program.

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U.S. Department of Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood has announced that transit authorities can duke it out for a share of $101.4 million in federal funds by proposing innovative projects that promote the use of "clean fuels" for public transit. Says Secretary LaHood:

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Will you dump the pump today? That question comes from the American Public Transportation Association (APTA), the Sierra Club and the Natural Resources Defense Council in recognition of the sixth annual "Dump the Pump" day.

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Would you believe someone if they said they could revolutionize a city's public transit with no cost to taxpayers? Well that's exactly what Jerry Sanders, chairman and CEO of SkyTran, has proffered Detroit's local government. But, so far, officials haven't expressed much interest in the game-changing idea.

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Recently, the American Public Transportation Association (APTA) predicted that rising gasoline prices could lead to a savings of $14,376 for commuters in New York City who choose to switch from personal to public transportation. However, keeping that amount of coin in one's bank account may not be as simple as it first seems.

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