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With the advent of the DVR and streaming videos, companies are no longer able to rely on commercials to get their products in front of television viewers. Many companies, including automakers, have found an easy way to get around this by using product integrations. While product placement can be as subtle as a car used in a scene or in the backdrop of the show, product integration is essentially a mini commercial built into show's script.


Product placement in movies is a big business, but is it always necessary? This is the question we asked ourselves when watching the movie trailer for Sony Picture's new film due out this fall called Elysium – a 22nd Century story about the privileged and elite who live in their own separate dwelling while Earth rots away. Toward the end of the trailer, a flying car flashes across the screen, and what familiar logo do we see on this car's rump? Yup, Bugatti.


Product placement in television and film has become so commonplace that we almost expect any mention of a specific brand on camera to be paid for in full by the company in question. And so we might have assumed with this week's episode of Mad Men, but apparently that wasn't the case.


We've seen some painful product placement efforts revolving around cars over the past few years. Some of them involve movies or television shows, but more than a fair share come down to music videos. Yet none, absolutely none, can compare with the bizarre spectacle of Abby Cubey behind the wheel of the Mosler RaptorGTR.


If there's one television show we love here at Autoblog, it's Sex and the City. Carrie, Samantha, Charlotte and Miranda – all aflutter over noontime glasses of Kristal, gossiping about Prada, Mr. Big, converting to Judaism for all the wrong reasons and whoever/whatever Samantha humped last night. It's so fab! Just kidding, we hate that show and the ex-girlfriends that forced us to know this much about it. *Ahem.*


Click above for high-res pics of the 2009 Hyundai Genesis V6


Ford's been working with studios to get its product featured in films for years, one of the first being the original Batmobile. But the automaker has now teamed with Our Stories Films to target minorities with the production company's family-themed movies.


Perhaps the most talked about new car to appear in recent years that almost no one has actually driven yet is the Tesla Roadster. The impressive thing about this is that they have managed to pre-sell hundreds of these cars without spending a dime on advertising (aside from whatever was spent on a couple of press introductions). Certainly this site is as guilty as any when it comes to jumping on this bandwagon, although we honestly think that Tesla is onto something really special here and we ha


Each new James Bond film, in addition to being an event in and of itself, is a massive advertisement for every single branded item seen on the silver screen. Whether it's 007's Smirnoff vodka, Walther pistol, or Aston Martin automobile, each item's appearance on screen is indeed a Very Big Deal for the company behind it. And so, Ford is crowing about its involvement in Casino Royale in an article on its website (read it after the jump). The film represents the first time the general populace wil


Pontiac is breaking new ground with product placement next month with "Rush City," a DC Comics production heavily funded by General Motors in an attempt to hock its Pontiac brand to men in their 20s and 30s. The six-issue series will debut on July 19.


Product placement is a time-honored trend. We're quite sure that Ford is pining for a Bullitt remake, for example, but the war seems to be heating up.

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