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Documents Show Federal Government Mulled Plan To Track Gun Enthusiasts

Drug Enforcement Administration officials once considered using license-plate readers to conduct surveillance on gun show attendees, according to documents released Tuesday.

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But Older Drivers Nearly Twice As Resistant As Younger Ones

Interested in savings as much as 30 percent off your insurance premiums? Safe drivers can do so, if they're willing to share their personal driving data.

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In October the Association of Global Automakers and the Alliance of Automobile Manfuacturers informed the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration that they were working together on a set of privacy protection guidelines for drivers. The privacy concerns the data collected by modern automobiles, like vehicle location, biometrics or infotainment usage, that automakers use to "enable a better overall driving experience." Even though the information is anonymized, the fear is that – wit

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Critics Say New Measures Don't Go Far Enough In Securing Information

"Automakers believe that strong consumer data privacy protections are essential to maintaining the trust of our customers." – Mitch Bainwol

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Critics say new measures don't go far enough in securing information

In a letter to the Federal Trade Commission, the 12 manufacturers that are members of the Auto Alliance committed to upholding principles that would provide more transparent notices to consumers about what data is being collected, minimize the amount and time of data that is stored and prohibit this information from being given to law enforcement without a court order.

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Three Recent Court Cases Pit Law Enforcement Against Privacy Advocates

Law enforcement agencies know a lot about the whereabouts and daily habits of millions of American motorists through the use of automated license-plate readers.

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Ford To Hire Global Privacy Policy Attorney

A recent GAO report concluded car companies don't adequately disclose how and why they share location data.

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Court ruling says police can search a car based on probable cause alone

Police officers in Pennsylvania no longer need a warrant to search your car during a traffic stop. A recent court ruling granted law-enforcement authorities broader powers in determining whether they can search a vehicle.

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The federal government's plan to build a nationwide database of information culled from license-plate scanners has been canceled. Officials from the Department of Homeland Security quickly reversed course on the proposed project late Wednesday, saying top officials within the department and the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency were unaware of it.

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OfficeMax incident latest cause for concern over automotive privacy

An Illinois father grieving the loss of his daughter in a car accident found a disturbing piece of junk mail when he went to his mailbox last week.

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Motor club wants stricter handling of driving data

One week after a government report detailed how car companies keep data on the whereabouts of millions of drivers, one of the nation's leading motor clubs is urging car companies to better protect consumer privacy.

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Privacy advocates fear how such information may be used, new report says

Automakers are obtaining location data through real-time navigation functions and other on-board location services and storing it for varying lengths of time. They need to provide motorists with more information on how and why they're collecting and sharing data, according to a report released Monday.

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Back in 2003, former Ford executive William Santana Li and former police officer Stacey Dean founded Carbon Motors, a company that designed a purpose-built diesel police car that recently filed for bankruptcy. But they're at it again, this time with a new company and a new invention that looks eerily similar to R2D2: a robotic security guard.

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Insurance companies are using driver behavior data to determine which drivers are the safest

Insurance companies have been using tracking devices to monitor driver behavior for a couple of years, and have learned that there are three things you might be doing that could indicate you're a higher-risk customer (and, sadly, will have to pay more that safer drivers for your insurance.)

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Privacy concerns follow close behind new legislation

The California State Senate has just approved a bill to create a pilot electronic license plates program. The program, the first of it's kind in the US, would affect less than one percent of drivers over four years.

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California could have become the fifth state to issue enhanced driver's licenses (EDL) and identification cards embedded with radio frequency identification (RFID) chips, but last Friday, state lawmakers suspended the legislation over privacy concerns. The RFID-equipped cards were to be optional, but ultimately it was a lack of measures to prevent law enforcement from tapping into the chips that killed the bill, WIRED reports.

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In the face of rising auto insurance premiums, insurance companies have been responding with potentially cheaper, pay-as-you-drive plans that, for billing purposes, track when, how, how much and where drivers use their vehicles instead of basing rates on statistics and past trends, The Detroit News reports. The practice isn't yet mainstream, but the National Association of Insurance Commissioners predicts 20 percent of insurance plans will be pay-as-you-go in five years; right now they account f

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These event data recorders are already in 96 percent of vehicles

If you thought police tracking your movements via license plate scanners was creepy, you may want to check your owner's manual to see if your own car has been spying on you for decades.

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Unregulated cameras store information indefinitely

Government surveillance isn't just in our phone records and search engine history, but on our roads as well.

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Critics worry about the cars' data collection

First there was the horseless carriage. Next comes the driverless car.

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It's been working its way through Congress for years, but according to Car and Driver, an event recorder mandate could soon become law. The Senate has already voted to adopt a transportation bill that would make the so-called "black boxes" mandatory by the 2015 model year. According to the report, the House of Representatives is also expected to pass a similar statute.

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