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18How the Pentagon plans to deal with climate change

DOD Says Uncertain Cause 'Cannot Be An Excuse For Delaying Action'

In case the Pentagon didn't make it clear enough that climate change is a real and dangerous thing in its Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR) earlier this year, perhaps the new Climate Change Adaptation Roadmap (PDF) will drive the point home. Some of the content is roughly the same, but that title sure makes it sound more desperate.

1Pentagon could chip in $300M for Lockheed's F-35 cost-cutting effort

Following on Lockheed Martin's announcement that it is attempting to trim the cost of a single F-35 fighter by way of a $170-million investment between now and 2019, the Pentagon could be set to announce that it will toss in as much as $300 million to that effort.

1Making the case for more drone investment

Today, America's armed forces aren't known for its aircraft carriers, fighter jets, tanks or guns – it's known for its drones. Whether they be Predators, Reapers, Global Hawks or something that takes up slightly less headline space, the US use of drones has been the single most identifying feature of America's military in the past several years.

88Pentagon says climate change is clearly a present danger, again

Like the Olympics and leap year, the Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR) comes at us every four years. A big-picture look by the US military at the threats they see out there, the QDR (PDF) is a broad document, but you can read in it just how big the military thinks its mission is (global dominance, really). As part of that mission, the military tries to find a way to reduce the threats it sees, but what do you do about dirty air that we all create? You can't go and bomb the highways to stop the ca

AddPentagon to buy 1,500 Chevy Volts; critical comments can't be far behind

Now it's going to get fun. Reports are out that the U.S. Department of Defense will buy as many as 1,500 Chevrolet Volt plug-in hybrids from General Motors, and some folks are already in a tizzy about it.

32Perhaps now they'll listen: Pentagon adds climate change to national security debate

The Pentagon is taking a serious look at how global climate change will dramatically affect the national security of the United States in the coming decades. The Pentagon's reasoning is as follows: climate change is going to be about the biggest SNAFU imaginable and could "topple governments, feed terrorist movements or destabilize entire regions," in the next two or three decades, the New York Times writes. The biggest danger areas: the Mid-East, South and SE Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. Anothe

8DARPA Grand Challenge hits the streets with Urban Challenge

The dust has hardly settled on the second DARPA Grand Challege and the Pentagon’s Defense Advance Research Project Agency has already announced a new challenge that pits competitors and their autonomous vehicles against an urban environment. The new Urban Challenge will occur on November 3, 2007, but not before many rounds of qualifying. The course will be 60-miles long and entrants must safely complete it in less than six hours while obeying traffic laws, avoiding obstacles, merging with

AddPentagon to use new fuel as it stakes its claims in old fuels

Earlier this month, a company called O2Diesel Corporation announced it was developing a new type of renewable fuel for the Pentagon. The article, from The Auto Channel, describe this new fuel as a “cleaner burning alternative diesel fuel” and says it will be made up of 20 percent renewable resources (apparently it will be 7.7vol% fuel grade ethanol) and will conveniently include the company’s proprietary solubilizing additive O2D05. The Department of Defense, which is the large

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