5 Articles
1 / 1
33

Salt water as fuel? Not exactly, but kinda. John Kanzius discovered that by focusing certain radio-frequencies on a test tube of salt water, he could ignite the contents, which would them become hot enough to melt the test tube. The process has been independently verified by Rustum Roy, a Penn State University chemist. According to Roy, what is actually happening is the hydrogen is being separated from the salt water and ignited. As long as the water is bombarded with the radio-frequency, it con

1

Cellulose is everywhere in the plant world and contains tremendous amounts of untapped energy. The problem is the long chains of sugars that make up cellulose is tough to break apart, something well known to ethanol researchers. Fuel cells are able to harness chemical reactions to release electrons that can be used as a power source. While hydrogen is the best known input for fuel cells it is by no means the only one.

1 / 1
Share This Post

Pennstate Questions

There are no questions about this topic.
Be the first to ask!

From Our Partners