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How does Charlestonia or Steeltownia sound? Because the whole livability bug notably biting cities such as Portland has gotten bigger via the proliferation of dedicated bikeways in a number of US cities. The latest to join are Pittsburgh, PA and Charleston, SC, Treehugger most happily reports.


Peak Car is the theory that one day soon, the global auto industry will reach its sales maximum and numbers will only decrease from then on. Increase in the number of city dwellers, concerns over pollution and crippling gridlock (all of which are conveniently shown above, in Beijing) could all contribute to the auto industry reaching peak car.


So, the US metropolitan areas with the largest percentage jump in commuters that bike to work are Portland, Madison, San Francisco and Denver. Now that we've gotten the "no duh" portion of the US Public Interest Research Group's (PIRG) recent study on urban driving habits out of the way, we can dig further into a report that argues that we're about nine years past the year when "peak car" happened.


In less than 20 years traffic could be a thing of the past

Here's a crazy thought: By 2030 we might be asking "What happened to traffic?"


The "Peak Car" theory says U.S. citizens will buy fewer cars

Compared with the rest of the world, the U.S. has long been known as the gas guzzler country--the nation of the widest roads, largest vehicles and the least amount of reliable mass transit for the geography. That image could be changing, according to a new study that says driving in the U.S. has already peaked and will decline.


The mood at the 2013 North American International Auto Show has been more than upbeat for automakers. Lots of new models and concept cars have been unveiled and automakers think it will be a good year for a solid sales increase. Quartz writer Tim Fernholz looked at it from another angle, raising some big questions. What if this post-economic crisis renaissance is short lived? Is the world approaching "peak car" – when demand for cars declines? And will the role of manufacturers change from

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