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Two different outlets are reporting two seemingly conflicting reports about pay at General Motors, but it's clear regardless of the details that money is in motion at The General. Ed Whitacre, Jr., who doesn't receive any pay as GM's chairman, is waiting on approval from the Treasury pay czar for a $9 million "pay package" for his recent move to CEO. The pay has been "approved 'in principle'," but we aren't sure when it's going to be paid.

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It's official: pay czar Kenneth Feinberg's executive compensation rules for companies yet to return their bailout funds means a cap of $500K for second-tier executives. Importantly, that number represents the total compensation allowed, but only 45 percent of it -- $225,000, can be in cold, hard ducats. Stock remuneration must be held or paid out over at least two years, and extracurricular perks like country club memberships and private jet escapades can be valued at no more than $25,000.

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Cerberus submitted its plans for Chrysler Financial to the U.S. Treasury, and then in an announcement that came as a surprise to Cerberus itself, the Treasury said that Chrysler Financial would be shutting down by December 31, 2011. The lending arm paid back its $1.5 billion loan from the government's TARP program, but much of its dealer financing and loan operations were replaced by GMAC.

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When General Motors and Chrysler took money from the U.S. government to prevent being consigned to history, the two storied domestic automakers had no choice but to put their fates in Uncle Sam's hands. After two very brief bankruptcies and billions in bailout cash, America's favorite bearded relative is looking to take its own pound of flesh.

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