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Jeremy Clarkson, the outspoken host of Top Gear, may be pondering a run at the UK's Parliament, according to a tweet he posted over the weekend. Of course, the note, which has now been retweeted over 4,400 times, comes from a man whose penchant for hyperbole is legendary, so take this musing with the usual grain of salt. There's been no further mention of his political aspirations since the original tweet went up, leading us to assume that it was just idle banter.


Mark Thompson, director general of the BBC, has been forced to go to bat for Top Gear presenter Jeremy Clarkson after the television host jokingly suggested striking public sector workers should be shot in front of their own families. Yep. That sounds like Clarkson to us.


Could Jeremy Clarkson find himself in a position of real power? Not of the MOAR variety, but rather of a political nature. If the British public gets its way, then anything is possible.


The European Parliament has called for Formula One to adopt more environmentally-friendly engine alternatives, and the FIA seems to be all for it.


Ford's advanced hydrogen internal combustion engine (HICE) powered shuttle bus program delivered three vehicles in early December to Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Canada to begin an important pilot program. Quantum Fuel Systems Technologies Worldwide, Inc. are providing the hydrogen fuel injectors used in the HICE E450s which will be included in the Senate shuttle bus fleet for evaluation.


This one's a bit comical. We're all aware that reducing your speed while driving leads to fuel savings and reduced emissions, but no one in their right mind in Washington is going to suggest we lower speed limits. That's apparently not so in Britain. Auto Express is reporting that last week, while the Members of the British Parliament were discussing climate change, Nia Griffith, a Labour Party MP (Member of Parliament), suggested an extremely cost-effective way of reducing the speed limit on al

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