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34How being fat and old is the newest threat to auto safety

There's no easy way to say this, America: You're getting fatter and older every year. Over a quarter of the population is obese, and the rate of obesity increases 0.5 percent each year. The amount of folks aged 65 and up currently stands at 40 million, but that number will increase to nearly 90 million by 2050. What does any of this have to do with automobiles? A lot – if you're a safety engineer.

16Does driving make you fat? Can public transportation, biking and walking keep you skinny?

To follow up on our recent article titled "Overweight and overfueled - fat America uses more gas" we thought we'd offer some additional information that's relevant to the topic. A recent study conducted by the American Public Transportation Association (APTA) suggests that U.S. drivers may be overweight partially due to factors beyond their immediate control. The APTA study found that:

69Overweight and Overfueled - CDC says fat America uses more gas

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently released a new report on obesity in the U.S. According to the study, the U.S. witnessed a 1.1 percent increase in the number of self-reported people with obesity between 2007 and 2009. The increase amounts to 2.4 million additional Americans admitting that they have joined the category of obese individuals. In addition, the number of states reporting that at least 30 percent of its population fit into the obese category has tripled to

36Overweight and Overfueled - CDC says fat America uses more gas

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently released a new report on obesity in the U.S. According to the study, the U.S. witnessed a 1.1 percent increase in the number of self-reported people with obesity between 2007 and 2009. The increase amounts to 2.4 million additional Americans admitting that they have joined the category of obese individuals. In addition, the number of states reporting that at least 30 percent of its population fit into the obese category has tripled to

26Study: Want to improve your odds of surviving a crash? Have another sammich

There aren't a lot of positives about being overweight, but a study by the University of Michigan shows that there could be one reason for the chunky among us to celebrate. U of M studied 300,000 traffic fatalities obtained from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration between 1998 and 2008, and it has reportedly found that overweight people had a 22 percent lower fatality rate than underweight people. However, the story changes for the worse if you're a man with a Body Mass Index (BMI

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