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If you've got an older car in your driveway, which experts say is getting to be more typical lately, what happens when the battery poops out? You'll be paying $100 to $200 to pick one up at a retail parts store. But what about hybrid electric vehicles?

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Consumers are keeping their automobiles for longer periods than ever before, according to a study performed by the survey gurus at R. L. Polk & Co. For anyone keeping track of such things, this news comes as little surprise – average length of ownership has been steadily increasing at an average rate of 3.7 percent annually.

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With 690,000 vehicles sentenced to one final gargle of sodium silicate, thanks to the now-defunct Cash for Clunkers program, demolition-derby drivers seem to have been left holding the short end of the driveshaft. What the government seems to have forgotten is that many cars, hobbling and sputtering as they near death, prefer to make one final trip to the local county fair (assuming they escape a 24 Hours of LeMons team). There, stripped of glass and with fuel tanks moved safely inward, the clun

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We knew it was coming. Right on schedule, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D, Calif.) has introduced legislation to Congress that would pay drivers of older vehicles a predetermined sum to replace them with new or newer cars. Depending on the year of the vehicle being traded in, a voucher for up to $4,500 would be granted to the driver. This voucher could be used to purchase a car manufactured after 2004 that has an EPA fuel mileage rating that is at least 25 percent better than industry average for

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Here's a question that often comes up when discussing the green automotive scene: Is it more eco-friendly to keep your old car or to buy a new, more fuel efficient model? The answer is, as you may have guessed, very complicated. One way to attack the question is on carbon emissions, and this is the main tack that Scientific American has taken when analyzing the issue. According to SciAm, due to the emissions created when manufacturing vehicles, you should keep your current car as long as possibl

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All of the clean new vehicles in the world won't amount to much if they don't replace the older, dirtier fleet of cars currently on the roads. For this reason, some U.S. states are beginning to offer programs which pay drivers to turn in their old clunkers for new, cleaner cars and trucks. In Texas, for instance, up to $3,500 is available to qualifying families which earn less than $63,000 per year in combined income and own a vehicle which fails current emissions testing. Texas was able to reti

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Considering that the legacy left behind by American car companies has little to do with being clean, there seems to be an increased sense of urgency by some U.S. states to replace the older fleet of vehicles with newer, and therefore cleaner, vehicles. The states with the two largest vehicle fleets, Texas and California, have both implemented new programs which offer cash-based incentives to owners of older vehicles which fail current emissions testing. In Texas, up to $3,500 is offered towards

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Will the Toyota Yaris, Honda Fit and the upcoming Nissan Versa join the Buick Le Sabre and even the Toyota Camry as "Grandparent's Most Favorite Ride?" That's what analysts think about the new wave of subcompacts arriving in America. According to John Wolkonowicz, automakers are once again making the mistake that younger buyers' primary concern is cost. "This is not a meek generation. They (Generation Y) want you to see them arrive," says the Global Insight analyst. "A car is like

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