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437-11 shrinks Big Gulp to make it more cupholder friendly

Look around. See anyone who could stand to lose a few pounds? Of course you do. Americans are fat. And not in a funny, two-twins-riding-on-the-back-of-motorcycles way, but in a depressing, billions-wasted-on-health-care-costs-associated-with-obesity way. That's why you have guys like New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg hacking away at the tip of the iceberg by trying to ban extra large sodas from the world.

1Weighty Issue: Obese People More Likely To Die After Severe Car Crashes

Morbidly obese people 56 percent more likely to die from accident injuries

People who are overweight have always had it tough. Obesity has been linked to a myriad of health problems ranging from asthma to heart disease to cancer.

64America's obesity problem equals a billion gallons of gas per year

Newsflash: Americans are fat. And no, we're not just big boned. Obesity has reached epidemic proportions over the past couple decades, and as a result diabetes, heart disease and just about every other health issue are on the rise.

120America's obesity problem equals a billion gallons of gas per year

Newsflash: Americans are fat. And no, we're not just big boned. Obesity has reached epidemic proportions over the past couple decades, and as a result diabetes, heart disease and just about every other health issue are on the rise.

63Extra passenger pounds can cancel out vehicle lightweighting efforts

Americans, on average, have gained enough weight during the past 40 years to cancel out automakers' vehicle-lightweighting efforts such as using lighter components or removing spare tire, reflecting an additional challenge automakers face to meet progressively more strict fuel-economy and greenhouse-gas emissions standards. The information comes from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in a recent Automotive News report.

AddDoes driving make you fat? Can public transportation, biking and walking keep you skinny?

To follow up on our recent article titled "Overweight and overfueled - fat America uses more gas" we thought we'd offer some additional information that's relevant to the topic. A recent study conducted by the American Public Transportation Association (APTA) suggests that U.S. drivers may be overweight partially due to factors beyond their immediate control. The APTA study found that:

69Overweight and Overfueled - CDC says fat America uses more gas

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently released a new report on obesity in the U.S. According to the study, the U.S. witnessed a 1.1 percent increase in the number of self-reported people with obesity between 2007 and 2009. The increase amounts to 2.4 million additional Americans admitting that they have joined the category of obese individuals. In addition, the number of states reporting that at least 30 percent of its population fit into the obese category has tripled to

AddOverweight and Overfueled - CDC says fat America uses more gas

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently released a new report on obesity in the U.S. According to the study, the U.S. witnessed a 1.1 percent increase in the number of self-reported people with obesity between 2007 and 2009. The increase amounts to 2.4 million additional Americans admitting that they have joined the category of obese individuals. In addition, the number of states reporting that at least 30 percent of its population fit into the obese category has tripled to

25Ironic Study: Not owning a car can make you fatter. Sorta.

Can not owning a car make you fatter? Iteems conventional wisdom would have it that people who don't own cars might tend to get more exercise having to walk everywhere they go, no? No. Well not completely, at least according to a new study that appears in the September issue of the Journal of Urban Health. While the study doesn't imply that walking isn't good exercise, it does take a closer look at where those people without cars are walking to. And if you happen to live in a poorer neighborhood

48REPORT: Fat people waste gas

Gas prices have settled a bit in the past few months, but with the cost of a gallon still lingering well in the two-dollar range, many Americans are looking for ways to save a few bucks at the pump. But what if you are happy with your current car and don't want to be a new one that's more fuel efficient? One new study suggests you dump your spare tire.

23Super Sizing imports for Americans who always want fries with that

This article in USA Today acknowledges what many domestic automakers have known for years: Americans are getting larger and, thus, their vehicles need to get bigger.

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