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102Aging, Obese Crash Test Dummies In Development To Replicate US Population

Obese people are 78 percent more likely to die in a crash

America's well-publicized weight problem and aging population of baby boomers is collaborating to bring about a change in the humble crash test dummy, as automakers and safety regulators are attempting to build vehicles even better suited to our changing population.

72Obese drivers more likely to die in car crashes

Moderately obese people, who have a body mass index greater than 30, typically shave three years off of their lives, just by being overweight. (Morbidly obese people lose 10 years, according to one study.) And then there's that long list of potential health problems obese people face in America ranging from asthma and diabetes to heart disease and cancer – as well as scorn and ridicule from skinny judgmental people. So it only makes sense that obese people are statistically less likely to

64America's obesity problem equals a billion gallons of gas per year

Newsflash: Americans are fat. And no, we're not just big boned. Obesity has reached epidemic proportions over the past couple decades, and as a result diabetes, heart disease and just about every other health issue are on the rise.

120America's obesity problem equals a billion gallons of gas per year

Newsflash: Americans are fat. And no, we're not just big boned. Obesity has reached epidemic proportions over the past couple decades, and as a result diabetes, heart disease and just about every other health issue are on the rise.

10Overweight children no less safe in their car seats

As any parent will tell you, not all children are the same. Some are tall, some are short. Some are slim, and some are... less slim, if you catch our politically correct drift. This raises an interesting question: Do overweight children need specifically engineered safety seats?

73U.S. walking less than rest of world blamed on cars, inadequate mass transit

Sigh. It seems that the world's view of fat, lazy Americans is about to get yet another image-draining hit to the shapely round gut. According to a study led by Dr. David R. Bassett of the University of Tennessee that was published in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, Americans lag far behind other highly developed nations when it comes to walking.

32U.S. walking less than rest of world blamed on cars, inadequate mass transit

Sigh. It seems that the world's view of fat, lazy Americans is about to get yet another image-draining hit to the shapely round gut. According to a study led by Dr. David R. Bassett of the University of Tennessee that was published in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, Americans lag far behind other highly developed nations when it comes to walking.

16Does driving make you fat? Can public transportation, biking and walking keep you skinny?

To follow up on our recent article titled "Overweight and overfueled - fat America uses more gas" we thought we'd offer some additional information that's relevant to the topic. A recent study conducted by the American Public Transportation Association (APTA) suggests that U.S. drivers may be overweight partially due to factors beyond their immediate control. The APTA study found that:

26Study: Want to improve your odds of surviving a crash? Have another sammich

There aren't a lot of positives about being overweight, but a study by the University of Michigan shows that there could be one reason for the chunky among us to celebrate. U of M studied 300,000 traffic fatalities obtained from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration between 1998 and 2008, and it has reportedly found that overweight people had a 22 percent lower fatality rate than underweight people. However, the story changes for the worse if you're a man with a Body Mass Index (BMI

20Supersize your patient: Canada gets ambulance suitable for 1,000-lb human

As waistlines expand in Canada, so, apparently, do the country's ambulances. Calgary has unveiled a new heavy-duty model designed to transport obese patients weighing up to 1,000 pounds. Standard ambulances, by comparison, are equipped to handle individuals weighing up to 350 pounds (which is also obese, last we checked, just not as much). The new ambulance will incorporate a lift system that will ease oversized patients into its rear compartment, which also accommodates a wider-than-normal stre

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