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20Nuclear-powered concept cars from the Atomic Age

A Look Back At The Reactor-Fueled Optimism Of The '50s and '60s

In the 1950s and early 60s, the dawn of nuclear power was supposed to lead to a limitless consumer culture, a world of flying cars and autonomous kitchens all powered by clean energy. In Europe, it offered the then-limping continent a cheap, inexhaustible supply of power after years of rationing and infrastructure damage brought on by two World Wars.

AddNuclear energy and the Nissan Leaf

Read into this what you will, but Nissan may have given a subtle hint that it would prefer to have its all-electric Leafs powered by something safer than electricity make at a nuclear plant. The reason? The Japanese automaker recently presented a Leaf to an award-winning actor who starred in a dramatic film inspired by the deadly Fukushima nuclear power plant meltdown in 2011.

273This 192-wheel vehicle is carrying nuclear waste to Utah right now

In light of Japan's Fukushima disaster, the future of nuclear power is a topic of debate whenever alternative power sources are discussed. Whether you are for nuclear power or against it, one legacy of this technology will be the great lengths that governments and power companies must go to dispose of the spent fuel and other byproducts.

22Reputation of electric cars takes a hit in Japan due to tsunami aftermath?

Electric vehicle owners like to think of themselves as green, but that color may be taking on a more glowing, radioactive hue in Japan.

45Reputation of electric cars takes a hit in Japan due to tsunami aftermath?

Electric vehicle owners like to think of themselves as green, but that color may be taking on a more glowing, radioactive hue in Japan.

AddForgotten Concept: 1958 Ford Nucleon

Some things are better off forgotten. This would be one of them.

AddGreenpeace opposed to nuclear and coal powered electric vehicles

2011 Nissan Leaf – Click above for high-res image gallery

AddVinod Khosla writes about imprudent environmentalism and "Scheer nonsense"

I have got to tell you that the article linked to here is very long and takes a good while to get through. Then, after you have read the whole thing, you still need time to meditate on all of the points. But, after doing that, feel free to comment on some of the ideas that Vinod Khosla outlines and the points that he makes. I believe that some of what he has to say is true and has merit, but can't quite agree with everything. Here is a good point: "every coal-fired power plant is a ticking slow

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