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43Tom Magliozzi, host of NPR's Car Talk, dead at 77 [w/video]

Tom Magliozzi, one of the beloved hosts of National Public Radio's long-running Car Talk program has died. He was 77, and passed from complications related to Alzheimer's Disease.

14How a hostage negotiator buys a car

Planet Money on National Public Radio takes an aerial view of the government's "fiscal cliff" brouhaha via three different negotiating techniques – the issue isn't what each side is trying to get, but how each side might try to get it. The two hosts outline three different ways to persuade, and then use ordinary examples to demonstrate how we use the same techniques for quotidian affairs that Congress will use to decide the next phase of the nation's financial future.

42GMO crops so tough that farmers are turning to Kevlar tractor tires

Farming is one of the most difficult ways to earn a living. You'd think that with all the innovations mankind has developed over the centuries, we could make farmers' lives easier. But as it turns out, sometimes miracles of modern science make things tougher. Literally.

80Want people to obey the speed limit? Pay them.

Parents know that sometimes the chance for reward is a more powerful child obedience method than the threat of penalty. "Clean your room or your grounded" can be less effective than, "Clean your room and we'll go get ice cream."

181NPR's Planet Money claims the fate of the U.S. auto industry rests on the success of... Lincoln?

To claim the fate of the U.S. auto industry rests on the success or failure of Lincoln is about as bold a statement as one can make, but that's how far NPR program Planet Money goes in its latest episode (scroll down to listen). The gist of host Alex Blumberg and contributor Sonari Glinton's argument is that a successful luxury brand brings in more profit per unit sold, creates domestic manufacturing jobs and generates innovative technology that eventually trickles down an automaker's entire lin

59NPR's Click and Clack calling it quits on Car Talk this fall

NPR announced today that Car Talk, its beloved radio call-in show, will cease recording new episodes in the fall. Brothers Tom and Ray Magliozzi are retiring from the show, and while NPR will continue broadcasting "new" Car Talk episodes, they will be created from archived material. NPR says Tom, 74, and Ray, 63, will continue to write a weekly column and post to their website and Facebook.

112"Click and Clack" Hang Up Their Microphones and Wrenches

Car Talk, an NPR signature show, will end after 35 years on the air

They are two highly educated guys, schooled at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, with a shop in Cambridge Mass., the home of Harvard. But they sound like two funny everyman schlubs who did nothing short of changing the way generations of car owners thought about their vehicles.

119GM leads worst performing auto stocks of 2011

In spite of General Motors standing poised to retake the top sales spot, Chevrolet perhaps breaking its all-time sales record, and an anticipated Buick and two new Cadillac models coming, GM's stock price got beat like a goat in 2011. On January 2, 2011 the stock traded at $37.06, on January 2, 2012, it hovered a few dimes above $20, making GM the worst-performing auto-industry stock of 2011: with a 46.1-percent drop, it edged out Cooper Tire (-41.7), TRW Automotive (-40) and Ford (-37.3).

21Report: Cuba's cadre of classic American cars in danger?

Cuba has an interesting law when it comes to the purchasing and sale of automobiles. While European and Asian cars can be imported, only vehicles built before 1959 (the year of the Cuban Revolution) are allowed to trade hands on the open market.

36This American Life tells the NUMMI story

One of the highest-rated shows on National Public Radio is This American Life, which does deep-dives into weekly themes, exploring subject matter from different angles while always leaving the listener enriched. This past Sunday, the show spent an hour going over the Toyota/General Motors joint venture in California, the NUMMI facility that will be shutting down this week.

51It's Friday: even the most efficient cars can't compete with bees in MPG fight

In case you've been wondering, the verdict is in: evolution beats engineering.

24NPR's Jason Beaubien drives across Cuba

As you're probably aware, we've imposed some pretty heavy trade embargoes against Cuba since just after Fidel Castro deposed Fulgencio Batista, and we've encouraged our friends to do likewise. As a result, there's a dearth of post-1960 cars running around the island nation. Pistonheads have long viewed Cuba with some interest, figuring that once Fidel and his brother Raul go bye-bye, the now closed, Communist nation will open its doors and sell some of all of the 1950s "Yank Tanks" that have bee

9Video: first look at John Goodwin's diesel add-on kit

NBC News got a look at mechanic John Goodwin's soon-to-be-released add-on kits for diesel cars in this video. The NBC video also takes a look under the hood of John's turbine, hybrid H3 that will get 60 MPG. That's not the only TV interview John has done recently. As promised, here is the article and full video of singer Neil Young and John Goodwin's appearance on CNN. In the CNN interview, John says "it's not cost-effective for someone to run out and spend $40,000 to double the fuel economy, bu

AddDiane Rehm spends the hour talking food prices, corn ethanol and farming

This morning, the most intelligent host in talk radio, Diane Rehm, spent the first hour of her show discussing food prices in America, with a focus on ethanol's effect on the cost of just about anything edible in our society. Her guests were Bruce Babcock, professor of economics and the director of the Center for Agricultural and Rural Development at Iowa State University; Dan Morgan, special correspondent, Washington Post and fellow at the German Marshal Fund of the United States; and Lauren Et

6Coming soon to a TV near you: Click and Clack

var digg_url = 'http://digg.com/television/Coming_soon_to_a_TV_near_you_Click_and_Clack'; Tom and Ray Magliozzi might be the first to admit that most people on the radio have faces that suit the medium, to put it delicately. There's no place to hide when you make the jump to television, but the Tappet brothers have avoided that with their new animated sitcom PBS will be rolling out next summer. The show is not yet named; a contest soliciting names from fans of the pair's radio show will be an

4NPR's Car Talk podcast added to iTunes Music Store

Car Talk is celebrating 20 years on NPR, and the self-effacing, often goofy show is now available in iTunes. It's exciting to "play along" and see if you come up with the same answer as brothers Tom and Ray, an now you can do that at your leisure. We have our local NPR station's schedule memorized, but sometimes it's just not possible to catch the show when it airs; throwing a tantrum won't always get you your way. The show certainly has its detractors, and some of the content can tend toward so

32Wait, wait. Bob Lutz said what?

National Public Radio has a quirky quiz show called "Wait, Wait, Don't Tell Me." GM Vice chair Bob Lutz was a guest on Saturday's show. And he said something interesting... in the spirit of the show, we're not going to tell you. Instead you have three choices:

1Rifkin: "Our common energy future lies with the sun, not with uranium"

We've been hearing a lot about nuclear power lately. Bush mentioned it as an ideal energy source to generate hydrogen fuel. An MIT study proposed two reactor concepts to produce nuclear hydrogen. This Weekend Edition story on NPR finds that a co-founder of Greenpeace is an active supporter. And the Nuclear Energy Institute says that nearly 7 out of 10 Americans don't mind it.

5DOE proposes to delay energy bill's 2010 alternative fuel deadline 20 years

Here's a lesson in legislation over-estimating reality. In 1992, Congress passed an aggressive energy bill requiring that 30 percent of the fuel powering U.S. cars come from sources other than gasoline. Sounds great, but the problem is that we're no where near meeting that deadline. Due to a recent environmental group lawsuit, the Department of Energy was required to develop a revised goal. Last Tuesday, the DOE proposed that goal be pushed back 20 years and be set at 2030.

Add"This little school teacher beat the automobile industry"

Back in June, Cheryl introduced you to the name Fran Pavley. Ms. Pavley, a member of the California Legislature, has been battling the auto manufacturers since she began her stint in public office 6 years ago and is largely to thank for California passing a landmark bill forcing industries to cut down on greenhouse gas emissions by about 25 percent by 2020.

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