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The National Corvette Museum wants to recreate the sinkhole everyday in a miniature version of the Skydome. While standing in an artificial cave, visitors can watch an imitation of the eight 'Vettes falling in.


Okay, so not exactly cars, but Bobcats - but still quite cool. Turns out the construction firm filling the sinkhole at the National Corvette Museum is using the two remote-controlled vehicles, and you can see it for yourself.


Since the catastrophe, attendance has shot up 59 percent.


Recovery and reconstruction efforts at the National Corvette Museum are moving forward on schedule since a sinkhole erupted in the middle of the museum's Skydome about two weeks ago. As of a few days ago, a crane was in place on a reinforced portion of floor to begin lifting the rare copies of America's favorite sports car from the Earth.


The rescue of the eight Corvette display cars that were eaten by a sinkhole at the National Corvette Museum last week has begun. Unfortunately, two of the cars are so thoroughly buried in soil and debris that they have not yet been seen. At least a geologist on scene says that he has not seen any further movement in the cars since the Earth consumed them.


The eight cars swallowed up when a sinkhole erupted in the middle of the National Corvette Museum earlier this week will be sent to General Motors Design's Mechanical Assembly, which handles restorations for the GM Heritage Collection, in Warren, MI for full restorations. Vice President of Design, Ed Welburn, will oversee the process.

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