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AddTrapster hacked, emails and passwords possibly compromised

Trapster just sent out an email to users informing them that the popular traffic and road hazard app's website has been the target of a hacking attempt and it's "possible that your email address and password were compromised."

5Exclusive: Navteq acquires Trapster

Earlier this week, the ink dried on a deal for Navteq to acquire Trapster, the speed trap and road hazard tracking company that makes GPS apps for iPhone, Android and Blackberry. Navteq's interest in Trapster is obvious: One of the world's largest mapping and sat-nav software companies needs more crowd-sourced traffic information. With over nine million downloads, Trapster has both the reach and programming knowledge to expand the depth and breadth of the firm's traffic data.

3Study: GPS systems with real-time traffic can save drivers four days per year, cut emissions by 21%

In Los Angeles, the 101/405 interchange is so congested that in 2002 it was determined that 27,144 hours per year were wasted trying to get from one freeway to the other. That's over 1,100 days. Per year. Not only does that number sound wildly low, but we guarantee it's gotten worse in the last seven years. Much worse. But according to a new study, GPS-systems with real-time traffic info can save American drivers four days a year of being mired in lousy traffic.

AddStudy: GPS systems with real-time traffic can save drivers four days per year, cut emissions by 21%

In Los Angeles, the 101/405 interchange is so congested that in 2002 it was determined that 27,144 hours per year were wasted trying to get from one freeway to the other. That's over 1,100 days. Per year. Not only does that number sound wildly low, but we guarantee it's gotten worse in the last seven years. Much worse. But according to a new study, GPS-systems with real-time traffic info can save American drivers four days a year of being mired in lousy traffic.

8Can GPS units makes you more fuel efficient? Navteq seems to think so...

A recent survey conducted by research firm NuStats and funded by GPS-maker NAVTEQ found that drivers equipped with in-car navigation units use 12% less fuel than their non-guided counterparts. The study focused on three groups of drivers in Germany. The first used no GPS at all, the second had a basic GPS and the third had a GPS unit that included traffic information. None of the participants had previously owned navigation units.

2GPS units makes you more fuel efficient? 12 percent, to be exact, says NAVTEQ

A recent survey conducted by research firm NuStats and funded by GPS-maker NAVTEQ has found that drivers equipped with in-car navigation units use 12 percent less fuel than their non-guided counterparts. The study focused on three groups of drivers in Germany. The first used no GPS at all, the second had a basic GPS and the third had a GPS unit that included traffic information. None of the participants had previously owned navigation units.

11Freightliner debuts RunSmart Predictive Cruise Control

The next step in cruise control comes courtesy of Freightliner semis and GPS data company NAVTEQ. Freightliner broadened communication between the cruise control and map data: the GPS transmits information on the road ahead up to a mile, and then the cruise control computes the best speed at which to cover the distance with the greatest fuel efficiency.

AddUSPS to use digital maps to find more efficient delivery routes

I'm not entirely sure just how much our editor Sebastian will like this general comparison, but when discussing transportation and energy issues both he and the somewhat controversial environmentalist George Monbiot like to say that despite all of the advances in alternative energy sources, there is simply no substitute for minimizing your vehicle/energy usage. In that vein, the United States Postal Service will be implementing a new digital map system to calculate more efficient delivery routes

8VZ Navigator: Do not pass Go, *do* pass destination, go directly to jail

Martha McKay of the Wichita Eagle recently tested the VZ Navigator, a GPS navigation system offered by Verizon for its Motorola V325 cell phone. The service became available in January.

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