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The Detroit News reports that former Chrysler CEO Bob Nardelli believes that the Obama Administration didn't need to hand the automaker to Fiat in order for the company to continue on. Instead, Nardelli says that a private equity firm could have easily taken the reins and steered the company back toward success. As you may recall, Nardelli left Chrysler in 2009 after the private equity firm Cerberus was forced to loosen its grip on the company. We don't need to elaborate on how well that whole e


We haven't heard much from Bob Nardelli since he and his Cerberus buddies rode off into the sunset last year in the wake of the Chrysler bankruptcy. Having proved pretty conclusively that he and his team were incapable of running a large automotive enterprise, Nardelli has apparently managed to climb back on the horse to try again at a slightly smaller enterprise, albeit in a different industry.


In a letter from California Congressman Darrell Issa to Chrysler's Bob Nardelli, the Auburn Hills executive is charged with failing to disclose information regarding the sale of the Dodge Viper line.


After weeks of speculation, Fiat confirmed today that its CEO, Sergio Marchionne, will assume the same role with Chrysler once it exits bankruptcy. According to statements from the Obama administration, Chrysler could emerge from "surgical bankruptcy" in as little as 30 to 60 days, after which Chrysler's current chief executive Bob Nardelli will step down and Marchionne will step in.


If you were surprised by the "resignation" of GM chief Rick Wagoner late last month, get used to the idea. Chrysler reportedly has some major management changes in store as well, including a new seven-member executive board including representatives from Fiat and the Obama administration's automotive task force. But while Bob Nardelli may stay on to chair that board, Chrysler's next CEO may not even be American. Sources close to the ongoing negotiations between Chrysler LLC and the Fiat Group su


Not long after the President concluded his televised press conference today, Chrysler released a statement saying that it and Fiat have already reached an "agreement on a framework of a global alliance".


President George W. Bush will doubtlessly be remembered for many things things, but his parting legacy may yet be his eleventh-hour pledge of $17.4 billion in low-interest loans to General Motors and Chrysler (Ford Motor Company has said it does not require relief at this time).


Click above for high-res gallery of the Dodge Hornet concept


Chrysler is losing money by the truck-load, and its vehicles aren't selling, so common sense dictates that team Pentastar was going to start making cuts soon. That time is now, when Chrysler notified workers that it would be cutting 1,000 white collar workers. Chrysler spokesman David Elshoff told employees that the company would achieve its cut target through retirements, attrition, and buyouts, which means people won't be handed boxes and receive security escorts just yet. Chrysler management


Chrysler's over-sized dealer-body has been struggling with the Pentastar's shrinking market share, but that's not stopping Chrysler brass from asking them for donations for the newly non-profit Walter P. Chrysler museum. Dealers are being asked to contribute $5,000 apiece to help keep the museum up and running, and in turn Chrysler is changing the museum's name to the Walter P. Chrysler Founding Dealers Society. Dealers that participate in the program will get their name added to the Founding De


If you have a Dodge Ram in the driveway and someone claiming to be Jim Press calls you asking if you're satisfied with your truck, it just might be him. Chrysler recognizes that it has a customer service problem, and the Pentastar is going to extraordinary lengths to correct it. Its top 300 executives and directors are participating in a program called "Customer First" that puts a priority on -- you guessed it -- the customer. The executives, even guys named Nardelli, Press, and LaSorda, are res


Cerberus Capital Management shot off a nine-page letter to investors outlining ways that Chrysler could sink, while also pointing out that they believe Chrysler's on the track for success. Some of the possible failure scenarios include a nasty recession, an extreme slowdown in the car market, or a further credit downturn. Credit is already looking green around the gills, and the potential for a widespread domino effect that starts with an implosion of the teetering mortgage business would be cat


Detroit's sharp intake of breath over the very real possibility of increased federal fuel economy standards apparently doesn't include Chrysler's voice. CEO Robert Nardelli has told The Car Connection that rather than waste lots of time and energy opposing the likely increase to a 35 mpg fleet average, Chrysler will put its head down and get it done. Attaining the goal will not be without pain, however. Cuts will be made, and the books are still in the red.


Chrysler has been through more changes in the past six months than any automaker in recent memory, and the announcement of former Home Depot CEO Bob Nardelli as Chrysler's head honcho is just another sign that the auto business in Detroit is rapidly changing. Nardelli was booted unceremoniously at America's home improvement store due to poor stock performance and an outlandish executive salary. He has no automotive experience, but he's the guy Cerberus wanted to lead Chrysler now and in the futu

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