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Hot on the heels of a report from one British car mag declaring the new MG6 – the company's first clean-sheet new product since its acquisition by Chinese automaker Nanjing – possibly the best-handling vehicle in its class come new reports that another all-new product is in the works for the iconic British marque.

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This will get some heads turning: after a drive on challenging Welsh roads, Autocar has written "In its poise and agility I'd even say the MG6 is superior" to the Ford Focus Zetec S. There are other compromises: the interior, the gearchange, the NVH, grunt at high revs. But the first bespoke Nanjing-created MG, the MG6, is a certified runner according to the UK mag.

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Just when there was beginning to be good news associated with MG, tales of woe return. This time it has to do with British entrepreneur Will Riley, who somehow established himself as the force behind the MG X-Power even though MG branding rights had been purchased by China's Nanjing.

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It is a travesty that the initials "MG" are coming to be a convenient epithet for the term "woe." The British sportscar maker has had an exceedingly trying history recently, and things haven't got any better with word that its owner, MG Motor UK Ltd. (which is really Nanjing Automobile Corporation), is reportedly closing the company's Longbridge plant.

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Do you need a small bus to carry around 12 people and you'd rather it was all-electric? Naijing Iveco has one for you. The manufacturer starts with a previous-generation European-version of an Iveco Daily (the manufacturer is related to Fiat) and installs an electric powertrain. According to Gasgoo, the vans have a range of 220km (150 miles) using about 40 kWh of electric power. No word on the battery technology, though. The Iveco EVs are destined to run as official service buses and they are th

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Is a British automaker still British if it's foreign owned? This is an increasingly relevant question, as England's biggest car brands have been gobbled up by foreign concerns. Jaguar and Land Rover are owned by India's Tata, Aston Martin by a group of Kuwaiti investors, Bentley is part of the Volkswagen Group, Rolls-Royce under the BMW umbrella, and Lotus is owned by Malaysian state automaker Proton. This leaves the LTI taxi cab company as the largest independent, self-owned British automaker.

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Nanjing is still hanging IV bags on the battered carcass of MG, and there's a new hatchback model coming for 2010 that the automaker hopes will breathe new life into the the brand. Based on SAIC's Roewe 550, the new hatchback is about the size of a Euro Focus, and will reportedly be built at the historical MG home of Longbridge, in the UK. The car looks a little flashier than the Roewe version, and engineers from Ricardo are lending development expertise to make sure the suspension settings are

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MG's former Longbridge, UK headquarters has been pretty quiet since production ceased in 2005. Newly-merged owners SAIC and Nanjing want the clatter of carbuilding to once again echo through the plant and plan to base their European and overseas operations there. The plant itself has the capability to build up to three different models; the challenge is deciding which of the former rival's products to build there. MG TF roadsters will likely lead the charge, with cars due at retail locations by

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The twisted saga of MG's resurrection from the ashes at the hands of Chinese automakers has come full circle. Last year both SAIC Motor Corp. and Nanjing Automobile Corp. fought tooth and nail for the right to build MGs in England, and Nanjing, the smaller of the two automakers by far, won. Since then the Chinese automaker has been trying to begin production of a new MG roadster at the company's plant in Longbridge, England. SAIC, meanwhile, accepted the defeat and instead purchased some MG prod

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Industry analysts widely agree that one of the principal factors preventing Chinese automakers from succeeding outside of China is the local industry's fragmentation, with over 100 automakers vying for their slice of the proverbial pie. However, a merger announced Wednesday between two major Chinese automakers, Shanghai Automotive Industrial Corp (SAIC) and Nanjing Automotive Group, stands a stronger chance of succeeding in the international car market as a larger group.

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Instead of beating each other's brains out and assuring that nobody wins, SAIC and Nanjing have decided to stand close to each other on the playground. While they may still avoid eye contact and kick pebbles instead of developing a friendship, they will be carrying out what they're terming a "comprehensive collaboration." Design, production and sales efforts will be pooled in an effort to make China's automakers competitive with outsiders like General Motors and Volkswagen, who currently dominat

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It appears that despite the incredulous whining and snarky commentary about Britain's MG being purchased by Nanjing and renamed Modern Gentleman, the Jiangsu, China based automaker has the best interests of MG in mind. They've been exceptionally careful stewards so far, quickly ramping up production in a huge, modern facility in China so that MGs could once again roll off the assembly line for the 60th anniversary of the brand. The familial MG homestead in Longbridge, UK has been reinvigorated a

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According to an article in the Financial Times, Nanjing Automotive Corporation, the Chinese owners of MG, are currently developing a new sports car that should be released sometime in 2009.

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Many speculated that this day would never come, but after six long and expensive months of equipping assembly lines and performing tests, Nanjing Automobile has produced its first MG.

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For those awaiting the return of the Modern Gentleman, your wait is nearly over if you live somewhere other than the U.S. New owners of the MG name and much of the defunct automaker's production equipment, Nanjing Automobile Group, have announced that production of cars based on the old MG TF roadster will begin in China as soon as March of this year, while low volume production of right-hand drive models will begin at the automaker's old Longbridge assembly plant in April or May. The Chinese pl

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It sounds to us like the kind of men's magazine you see at the supermarket. You know the one, the impossibly buffed-up guy on the cover touting a workout that only takes 2 minutes and will make you as solid as an oak tree. Whatever. Modern Gentleman? It sounds too genteel for its own good, nearly obscene. There's pretty much nothing left of the old MG, save the logo and the two letters. Originally denoting Morris Garages, MG's new owner, Nanjing Automobile Group, has elected to change the name t

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Since both Plan A and B have failed, Shanghai Automotive Industrial Corp. has decided to move on to Plan C, which means taking the intellectual property rights to the Rover 25 and 75 models it acquired last year and selling the vehicles under a new brand name. Today that name was announced, and when the new 750E "Rong Wei" (Chinese for "glorious power") is unveiled at the Beijing Auto Show in November it will be called the Roewe 750E. Hmm... kind of sounds like Roewe-ver, no?

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What's in a name? Well, for starters, heritage, prestige and, in the case of Rover, a loyal following whose unfettered obsession is only eclipsed by one Chinese automaker's pocketbook.

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The collapse of MG Rover was an expensive affair for the British government and its people. A report published by the country's Public Accounts Committee says that the decline of MG Rover between 2000 and 2004 cost tax payers around £270 million. A £500 million pension deficit will also likely be met by the country's Pension Protection Fund, and the defunct company still owes £109 million to creditors, which they likely won't be getting.

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