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Drunk driving is always dangerous and a problem across the country and the world, but certain places have a knack for attracting drunk drivers. In the US, those places tend to be rural western states.


We may never get back to the days where state speed limits were simply as fast as was "reasonable and prudent," but the wide-open state of Montana seems to at least be making an attempt, with state legislators considering an 80- or even 85-mile-per-hour speed limit. In other news, Autoblog's editorial office is preparing to relocate to Billings.


Hyundai no longer has to pay $248 million as part of a court ruling from a fatal accident in Montana that killed two cousins in a 2005 Tiburon. The judge hearing the appeal revised the amount down to a total of about $81 million. She upheld the original $8.1 million in actual damages but reduced the punitive damages to $73 million from the previous $240 million.


The state has left such laws up to municipalities

Montana became the only state in the nation that does not ban at least some drivers from texting when a new law took effect in South Carolina this week.


A Montana jury has levied a $248 million ruling against Hyundai in the case of a crash that killed two occupants in July 2011. The automaker plans to appeal the ruling.


"It really is a sin to waste a good meat," says Montana State Sen. Larry Jent, D-Bozeman. And so he's trying to do something about such sinfully wasteful practices by introducing legislation in Montana that would make it legal to recover roadkill – be it elk, deer, antelope or moose – for food. According to reports, it's likely that the bill will be passed.


Montana cop then fired 9 times at fleeing suspect, killing him

An incident that started as a tequila-fueled home burglary turned into a dramatic – and deadly – situation that involved a stolen police cruiser, an officer hit by a car and a fatal shooting.


Former Dallas Cowboys quarterback Ryan Leaf was arrested last Friday and charged with being in possession of prescription Oxycodone pills that weren't his. Three days after posting a $76,000 bond, the Associated Press says he's been arrested again.


Every conceivable medium, including art and pornography, has been drawn into figuring out where art ends and pornography begins. Now a lowly rear window in Montana has become the battleground for this contentious debate.


According to TheNewspaper.com, the city council in Billings, Montana, voted last week to hurriedly approve new automated red-light cameras – conveniently just before they are scheduled to be banned by the state legislature. With a potential clause allowing existing cameras to be grandfathered into legality still in negotiations, Billings would appear to be attempting to load up on the devices before the revenue-enhancing opportunity closes.


Montana could soon become the latest state to adopt California emissions rules if a recently-introduced bill becomes law. California still hasn't received the go-ahead from the EPA to even regulate carbon dioxide emissions but Montana Senate Bill 180 would make CO2 a regulated pollutant. If the EPA reverses a late-2007 ruling, automakers will have to achieve a fleet average of 44 mpg by the end of the next decade in order to meet the California standards. Montana Governor Brian Schweitzer suppor


A group of researchers from the University of Montana State has discovered that a type of fungi, called Gliocadium roseum, that can make gaseus biodiesel from vegetal waste. Turning waste into fuel is a key to second-generation biofuels. This fungus has been found on a Patagonian tree called ulmo (Eucryphia cordifolia), and the remarkable quality is that it produces biodiesel in gaseous form. According to Gary Strobel from the Universtiy of Montana, "This is the only organism we've found in the


Click on the photo for a high-res gallery of the AEV Kurrent factory tour


Normally one doesn't intend to take his $1.2 million McLaren F1 off the beaten path, but road trips often present obstacles that require extreme fortitude to overcome. Such a road block, or rather a construction zone, blocked the path of Miles Collier while he and his wife were traveling from their Montana ranch to Glacier National Park in their slightly used but brand-new-to-them McLaren F1.


Democratic governor Brian Schweitzer of Montana told the Washington press corp that the states are taking the lead in finding solutions to global warming and the nation's energy problems. Backing up his statement is a $1.3 billion coal-to-liquid-fuel facility that will be built in central Montana. He sees the plant as a source of new jobs and reducing dependence on foreign oil. He promised that CO2 emitted by the process will be trapped and pumped back into the earth. While noting he had to phon

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